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Our growing network in more than 20 countries represents globally renowned expertise on child well-being and rights. Explore our map to connect with researchers on your topic or country of interest.

Denmark
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Denmark

Denmark

Guatemala
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Guatemala

Guatemala

Honduras
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Honduras

Honduras

Mexico
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Mexico

Mexico

El Salvador
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El Salvador

El Salvador

Serbia
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Serbia

Serbia

Romania
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Romania

Romania

Moldova
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Moldova

Moldova

Kosovo
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Kosovo

Kosovo

Croatia
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Croatia

Croatia

Bulgaria
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Bulgaria

Bulgaria

Bosnia & Herzegovina
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Bosnia & Herzegovina

Bosnia & Herzegovina

Albania
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Albania

Albania

Yemen
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Yemen

Yemen

Tunisia
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Tunisia

Tunisia

Syria
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Syria

Syria

Pakistan
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Pakistan

Pakistan

Nigeria
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Nigeria

Nigeria

Myanmar
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Myanmar

Myanmar

Mali
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Mali

Mali

Iraq
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Iraq

Iraq

Maldives
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Maldives

Maldives

Thailand
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Thailand

Thailand

Angola
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Angola

Angola

Cameroon
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Cameroon

Cameroon

Burundi
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Burundi

Burundi

Sudan
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Sudan

Sudan

Palestine
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Palestine

Palestine

Mozambique
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Mozambique

Mozambique

South Sudan
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South Sudan

South Sudan

Laos
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Laos

Laos

Germany
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Germany

Germany

Central African Republic
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Central African Republic

Central African Republic

Nepal
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Nepal

Nepal

Lebanon
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Lebanon

Lebanon

Jordan
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Jordan

Jordan

Ghana
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Ghana

Ghana

Haiti
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Haiti

Haiti

Zambia
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Zambia

Zambia

Somalia
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Somalia

Somalia

Malawi
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Malawi

Malawi

Tanzania
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Tanzania

Tanzania

Cambodia
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Cambodia

Cambodia

Sierra Leone
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Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

Kenya
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Kenya

Kenya

Rwanda
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Rwanda

Rwanda

Brazil
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Brazil

Brazil

Bolivia
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Bolivia

Bolivia

Bangladesh
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Bangladesh

Bangladesh

Australia
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Australia

Australia

West Indies
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West Indies

West Indies

United States
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United States

United States

United Kindgom
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United Kindgom

United Kindgom

Uganda
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Uganda

Uganda

Sri Lanka
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Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka

South Africa
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South Africa

South Africa

Senegal
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Senegal

Senegal

Philippines
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Philippines

Philippines

New Zealand
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New Zealand

New Zealand

Liberia
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Liberia

Liberia

Indonesia
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Indonesia

Indonesia

Ethiopia
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Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Democratic Republic of the Congo
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Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Côte d'Ivoire
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Côte d'Ivoire

Côte d'Ivoire

Colombia
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Colombia

Colombia

Canada
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Canada

Canada

Burkina Faso
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Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso

Ajwang’ Warria

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Work
University of Calgary
Research topics
Migration
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Ajwang’ Warria, DLitt et Phil., is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary (Canada). Prior to this, she was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa). Her research interests lie in child protection, transnational migration, intervention research and international social work. She has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed publications.

Ajwang’ has led and supported various projects initiated by the South African government, USAID and UNICEF focusing on children on the move, trafficking in persons and alternative care for children. She has worked on various research, practice, and advocacy-related initiatives in southern and East Africa. In Canada, she is working with several community partners on violence prevention and migration data curation as part of a Newcomer Knowledge Hub. Her current projects in South Africa are addressing survivor-informed service provision to trafficked persons, Africentric trauma-informed practice, child migration, and community-based child protection.

Ajwang’ serves as a member of the Olympic Refuge Foundation Think Tank. She is a research fellow at the University of Johannesburg (South Africa). She holds a doctoral degree from University of Johannesburg and a Master degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Cape Town.

Ajwang’ Warria, DLitt et Phil., is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary (Canada). Prior to this, she was a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Work at the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg, South Africa). Her research interests lie in child protection, transnational migration, intervention research and international social work. She has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed publications.

Ajwang’ has led and supported various projects initiated by the South African government, USAID and UNICEF focusing on children on the move, trafficking in persons and alternative care for children. She has worked on various research, practice, and advocacy-related initiatives in southern and East Africa. In Canada, she is working with several community partners on violence prevention and migration data curation as part of a Newcomer Knowledge Hub. Her current projects in South Africa are addressing survivor-informed service provision to trafficked persons, Africentric trauma-informed practice, child migration, and community-based child protection.

Ajwang’ serves as a member of the Olympic Refuge Foundation Think Tank. She is a research fellow at the University of Johannesburg (South Africa). She holds a doctoral degree from University of Johannesburg and a Master degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Cape Town.

Amy E. Ritterbusch

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Welfare
University of California
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Violence
Gender
Accountability & Shifting Power
Connect

Dr. Amy Ritterbusch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Welfare at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was an Associate Professor in the School of Government at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. Amy has led social justice-oriented participatory action research (PAR) initiatives with street-connected communities in Colombia for the last decade and recently in Uganda. Her work involves the documentation of human rights violations and forms of violence exerted against homeless individuals, sex workers, drug users and street-connected children and youth, and subsequent community-driven mobilizations to catalyze social justice outcomes within these communities. Throughout her research and teaching career she has explored different approaches to engaging students and community members through critical and responsible interaction between classroom and street spaces in Colombia and Uganda through the lens of social justice-oriented PAR. Her research has been funded by the Open Society Foundations, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright U.S. Program and other networks promoting global social justice and her work has been published in Annals of the American Association of Geographers, Global Public Health,Child Indicators Research, Child Abuse & Neglect and other peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Amy Ritterbusch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Welfare at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was an Associate Professor in the School of Government at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. Amy has led social justice-oriented participatory action research (PAR) initiatives with street-connected communities in Colombia for the last decade and recently in Uganda. Her work involves the documentation of human rights violations and forms of violence exerted against homeless individuals, sex workers, drug users and street-connected children and youth, and subsequent community-driven mobilizations to catalyze social justice outcomes within these communities. Throughout her research and teaching career she has explored different approaches to engaging students and community members through critical and responsible interaction between classroom and street spaces in Colombia and Uganda through the lens of social justice-oriented PAR. Her research has been funded by the Open Society Foundations, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright U.S. Program and other networks promoting global social justice and her work has been published in Annals of the American Association of Geographers, Global Public Health,Child Indicators Research, Child Abuse & Neglect and other peer-reviewed journals.

Andres Ham

Faculty Affiliate
Associate professor
Alberto Lleras Camargo School of Government at the Universidad de los Andes
Research topics
Education
Violence
Systems Strengthening
Connect

Andrés Ham is an associate professor at the Alberto Lleras Camargo School of Government at the Universidad de los Andes. He has a PhD in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Illinois in the United States, with a Master's degree in Economics from the National University of La Plata, Argentina and a Bachelor's degree in Economics from the National Autonomous University of Honduras. He investigates labor markets, education, poverty and inequality, crime and violence, and the effects of public policies on the well-being of people in Latin America.

Andrés Ham is an associate professor at the Alberto Lleras Camargo School of Government at the Universidad de los Andes. He has a PhD in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Illinois in the United States, with a Master's degree in Economics from the National University of La Plata, Argentina and a Bachelor's degree in Economics from the National Autonomous University of Honduras. He investigates labor markets, education, poverty and inequality, crime and violence, and the effects of public policies on the well-being of people in Latin America.

Andrés Moya

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor at the School of Economics
Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Connect

Andrés Moya, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the School of Economics, Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He has a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Davis and Masters and Bachelors degrees in Economics from Universidad de Los Andes. He is a member of EGAP and a member of the scientific committee of the Colombian Longitudinal Survey of Universidad de Los Andes (ELCA). His research falls in the fields of Development and Behavioral Economics focusing on the economic, psychological, and behavioral consequences of violence and forced displacement in Colombia. In his research, Andrés has analyzed the effects of violence and psychological trauma on: (1) different dimensions of behavior, such as risk aversion, risk perceptions, and hope; (2) cognitive and socioemotional skills; (3) early childhood development; and (4) performance in job-training programs and in the labor market. A second area of his research agenda focuses on the relationship between poverty, inequality, and human capital accumulation. Currently, Andrés is leading the implementation and impact evaluation of Semillas de Apego, a group-based psychosocial intervention for primary caregivers, which aims to foster early childhood development among children exposed to violence in Colombia.

Andrés Moya, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the School of Economics, Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He has a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Davis and Masters and Bachelors degrees in Economics from Universidad de Los Andes. He is a member of EGAP and a member of the scientific committee of the Colombian Longitudinal Survey of Universidad de Los Andes (ELCA). His research falls in the fields of Development and Behavioral Economics focusing on the economic, psychological, and behavioral consequences of violence and forced displacement in Colombia. In his research, Andrés has analyzed the effects of violence and psychological trauma on: (1) different dimensions of behavior, such as risk aversion, risk perceptions, and hope; (2) cognitive and socioemotional skills; (3) early childhood development; and (4) performance in job-training programs and in the labor market. A second area of his research agenda focuses on the relationship between poverty, inequality, and human capital accumulation. Currently, Andrés is leading the implementation and impact evaluation of Semillas de Apego, a group-based psychosocial intervention for primary caregivers, which aims to foster early childhood development among children exposed to violence in Colombia.

Angela Maria Guarin

Faculty Affiliate
Ángela Guarín is an assistant professor at the Alberto Lleras Camargo School of Government
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Migration
Gender
Systems Strengthening
Violence
Connect

Guarín holds a PhD in Social Welfare from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Master's in Social Work from the same university, Sociologist and Social Communicator from the Universidad Javeriana-Bogotá. Her research interests include the study of changes in families, child and family social policies, vulnerable populations, poverty, inequality, and gender studies. She has recently advanced studies on the food quota system in Colombia and other countries from a comparative perspective; changes in family structures and their consequences, as well as their implications for family social policies; gender violence and social protection and migration.

Guarín holds a PhD in Social Welfare from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Master's in Social Work from the same university, Sociologist and Social Communicator from the Universidad Javeriana-Bogotá. Her research interests include the study of changes in families, child and family social policies, vulnerable populations, poverty, inequality, and gender studies. She has recently advanced studies on the food quota system in Colombia and other countries from a comparative perspective; changes in family structures and their consequences, as well as their implications for family social policies; gender violence and social protection and migration.

Anne Ruhweza Katahoire

Faculty Affiliate
Professor and former director of the Child Health and Development Centre
Makerere University College of Health Sciences
Research topics
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Sexual & Reproductive Health
Child Development
Connect

Anne Ruhweza Katahoire PhD, is a social and medical anthropologist with over 20 years of experience researching children and adolescent health. She has served as a consultant for local and international organizations including: AfriChild, Children AIDS Fund, Child Fund International, Plan International, WHO, UNICEF, PATH and Population Council. She has been a member of the College of Curators of Every Woman Every Child Innovation Marketplace and currently chairs the East African Children’s Rights and Violence Prevention Fund. She has a special interest in school and community-based interventions that address children’s health and development needs in their broadest sense including physical, emotional and social well being as well as those that promote healthy sexual and reproductive development of adolescents. She specializes in qualitative child-focused research methodologies. She is a faculty on the Joint Advanced Seminars run by the Consortium for Advanced Research training in Africa involving eight African universities and is engaged in the teaching and supervision of masters and PhD students.

Anne Ruhweza Katahoire PhD, is a social and medical anthropologist with over 20 years of experience researching children and adolescent health. She has served as a consultant for local and international organizations including: AfriChild, Children AIDS Fund, Child Fund International, Plan International, WHO, UNICEF, PATH and Population Council. She has been a member of the College of Curators of Every Woman Every Child Innovation Marketplace and currently chairs the East African Children’s Rights and Violence Prevention Fund. She has a special interest in school and community-based interventions that address children’s health and development needs in their broadest sense including physical, emotional and social well being as well as those that promote healthy sexual and reproductive development of adolescents. She specializes in qualitative child-focused research methodologies. She is a faculty on the Joint Advanced Seminars run by the Consortium for Advanced Research training in Africa involving eight African universities and is engaged in the teaching and supervision of masters and PhD students.

Arturo Harker Roa

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor of of the School of Government
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Child Development
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Connect

Arturo Harker Roa, PhD, is an Associate Professor of of the School of Government at the Universidad de los Andes. He completed his PhD in Economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His expertise lies in applied microeconomics and quantitative public policy evaluation. In the last three years his research agenda has focused on studying the impact of adverse childhood experiences, such as exposure to crime, violence, and forced displacement, and trauma on the development of cognitive, social, and emotional abilities. Dr. Harker focuses on the design and evaluation of interventions that help mitigate this impact. His recent research projects focused on the impact of urban violence on academic performance and psychotherapy to protect early childhood in the context of civil violence in Colombia.

Arturo Harker Roa, PhD, is an Associate Professor of of the School of Government at the Universidad de los Andes. He completed his PhD in Economics at the University of California, Los Angeles. His expertise lies in applied microeconomics and quantitative public policy evaluation. In the last three years his research agenda has focused on studying the impact of adverse childhood experiences, such as exposure to crime, violence, and forced displacement, and trauma on the development of cognitive, social, and emotional abilities. Dr. Harker focuses on the design and evaluation of interventions that help mitigate this impact. His recent research projects focused on the impact of urban violence on academic performance and psychotherapy to protect early childhood in the context of civil violence in Colombia.

Bernadette J. Madrid

Faculty Affiliate
Director of the Child Protection Unit (CPU)
University of the Philippines Manila – Philippine General Hospital
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Gender
Connect

Bernadette J. Madrid, MD is the Director of the Child Protection Unit (CPU) of the University of the Philippines Manila – Philippine General Hospital where she is concurrently Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. She is the Executive Director of the Child Protection Network Foundation, Inc., an NGO that supports the training of Child Protection Professionals and the development of Women and Child Protection Units in the Philippines. She is a member of several government committees on health, social welfare, law enforcement and the judiciary & is consistently invited to be a resource person for congressional & senate hearings on laws affecting women and children. Dr. Madrid has published several papers on child abuse & neglect which have led to changes in policy and practice in the Philippines. She has been a consultant and trainer for different international agencies such as UNICEF, WHO, UNESCAP & UNFPA. She is a reviewer for Child Abuse & Neglect, the International Journal, Journal of Interpersonal Violence and Trauma, Violence and Abuse. She has engineered changes in the medical, legal and social welfare paradigm on women and child protection in the Philippines that has led to her being the recipient of several national awards.

Bernadette J. Madrid, MD is the Director of the Child Protection Unit (CPU) of the University of the Philippines Manila – Philippine General Hospital where she is concurrently Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. She is the Executive Director of the Child Protection Network Foundation, Inc., an NGO that supports the training of Child Protection Professionals and the development of Women and Child Protection Units in the Philippines. She is a member of several government committees on health, social welfare, law enforcement and the judiciary & is consistently invited to be a resource person for congressional & senate hearings on laws affecting women and children. Dr. Madrid has published several papers on child abuse & neglect which have led to changes in policy and practice in the Philippines. She has been a consultant and trainer for different international agencies such as UNICEF, WHO, UNESCAP & UNFPA. She is a reviewer for Child Abuse & Neglect, the International Journal, Journal of Interpersonal Violence and Trauma, Violence and Abuse. She has engineered changes in the medical, legal and social welfare paradigm on women and child protection in the Philippines that has led to her being the recipient of several national awards.

Bree Akesson

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant professor in the Faculty of Social Work
Wilfrid Laurier University in Canada
Research topics
Violence
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Dr. Bree Akesson is the Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Global Adversity and Wellbeing, Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Security Practices, and Associate Professor of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University. She has worked for over two decades with children and families impacted by war and displacement in settings such as Chechnya, Northern Uganda, Palestine, Lebanon, and Afghanistan. Her program of research ranges from micro-level understandings of the experiences of war-affected families to macro-level initiatives to strengthen global social service workforce systems. Ongoing research projects include the perinatal experiences of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, the impact of climate change on families displaced by war, and integrated service access for refugee families. Dr. Akesson’s work has been cited over 1,000 times across a range of disciplines such as geography, health sciences, human rights, and psychology. Her latest book From Bureaucracy to Bullets: Extreme Domicide and the Right to Home—co-authored with Dr. Andrew Basso and published in 2022 by Rutgers University Press—was the inspiration for a United Nations report calling for the classification of home demolition as a war crime.

Dr. Bree Akesson is the Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Global Adversity and Wellbeing, Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Security Practices, and Associate Professor of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University. She has worked for over two decades with children and families impacted by war and displacement in settings such as Chechnya, Northern Uganda, Palestine, Lebanon, and Afghanistan. Her program of research ranges from micro-level understandings of the experiences of war-affected families to macro-level initiatives to strengthen global social service workforce systems. Ongoing research projects include the perinatal experiences of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, the impact of climate change on families displaced by war, and integrated service access for refugee families. Dr. Akesson’s work has been cited over 1,000 times across a range of disciplines such as geography, health sciences, human rights, and psychology. Her latest book From Bureaucracy to Bullets: Extreme Domicide and the Right to Home—co-authored with Dr. Andrew Basso and published in 2022 by Rutgers University Press—was the inspiration for a United Nations report calling for the classification of home demolition as a war crime.

Catalina Gonzalez Uribe

Faculty Affiliate
Associate professor
Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Sexual & Reproductive Health
Connect

She is an associate professor at the Faculty of Medicine in the Public Health and Epidemiology area and the Director of Internationalization at the Vice presidency of Research and Creation. Her research focuses on studying social inequalities in sexual health, reproductive health, and vector-borne diseases. She is passionate about interdisciplinary work, developing social indicators, and advising health projects with an intercultural focus. She graduated from Anthropology, Psychology, and a master's degree in Anthropology from Universidad de Los Andes. She also holds a master's degree in Social Epidemiology and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology and Public Health from University College London.

She is an associate professor at the Faculty of Medicine in the Public Health and Epidemiology area and the Director of Internationalization at the Vice presidency of Research and Creation. Her research focuses on studying social inequalities in sexual health, reproductive health, and vector-borne diseases. She is passionate about interdisciplinary work, developing social indicators, and advising health projects with an intercultural focus. She graduated from Anthropology, Psychology, and a master's degree in Anthropology from Universidad de Los Andes. She also holds a master's degree in Social Epidemiology and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology and Public Health from University College London.

Catherine Love

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Accountability & Shifting Power
Education
Connect

Dr. Catherine Love, PhD, has conducted work that spans practice, policy and academic spheres.  She is of New Zealand Maori (indigenous) descent, and has served as an elected member of her tribal governance entities for over twenty years. Formerly Director of Indigenous Research and Development at Victoria University of Wellington, Dr. Love moved from academia in 2005 to establish several innovative indigenous / endogenous economic and educational development initiatives. This included Ahikaa entrepreneurship education and the Ahikaa Accelerated Learning Centre. A long-time advocate for indigenous and endogenous supportive policies and practices, Dr. Love has taught and published internationally and has been a popular plenary speaker at social service, social policy, mental health and educational conferences.  In 2012, she was identified as one of 130 “innovators and influencers” in the field of Systems of Child andFamily Protection and Wellbeing. In 2014, she was appointed to the SteeringCommittee of the Global Social Services Workforce Alliance. Dr Love’s work has consistently promoted a reduced emphasis on the imposition of western perspectives, philosophies and systems;  and increased emphasis and resourcing of culturally cognisant, locally developed systems.

Dr. Catherine Love, PhD, has conducted work that spans practice, policy and academic spheres.  She is of New Zealand Maori (indigenous) descent, and has served as an elected member of her tribal governance entities for over twenty years. Formerly Director of Indigenous Research and Development at Victoria University of Wellington, Dr. Love moved from academia in 2005 to establish several innovative indigenous / endogenous economic and educational development initiatives. This included Ahikaa entrepreneurship education and the Ahikaa Accelerated Learning Centre. A long-time advocate for indigenous and endogenous supportive policies and practices, Dr. Love has taught and published internationally and has been a popular plenary speaker at social service, social policy, mental health and educational conferences.  In 2012, she was identified as one of 130 “innovators and influencers” in the field of Systems of Child andFamily Protection and Wellbeing. In 2014, she was appointed to the SteeringCommittee of the Global Social Services Workforce Alliance. Dr Love’s work has consistently promoted a reduced emphasis on the imposition of western perspectives, philosophies and systems;  and increased emphasis and resourcing of culturally cognisant, locally developed systems.

Chen Reis

Faculty Affiliate
Clinical Associate Professor and Director of the Humanitarian Assistance Program
Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver
Research topics
Violence
Gender
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Connect

Chen Reis, JD, MPH, is an expert on sexual violence in settings affected by crises and on ethical and safety issues related to collection and use of data on sexual violence. She is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of the Humanitarian Assistance Program at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She was previously a technical officer at the World Health Organization with appointments in the departments of Gender and Women’s Health and Health Action in Crises. Over seven years at the WHO her responsibilities included managing the Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) as well as technical and policy work on gender, sexual violence prevention and response and sexual and reproductive health in humanitarian settings and on humanitarian policy issues including civil military coordination and humanitarian space. Ms. Reis continues to consult for WHO on projects relating to sexual violence including medico-legal aspects. Her current research is on accountability in the international humanitarian system and on sexual violence in conflict settings. She has also served as a Senior Research Associate with Physicians for Human Rights (USA) where her work included studies on sexual violence, children’s rights, women’s rights, HIV & AIDS, and conflict & health.

Chen Reis, JD, MPH, is an expert on sexual violence in settings affected by crises and on ethical and safety issues related to collection and use of data on sexual violence. She is a Clinical Associate Professor and Director of the Humanitarian Assistance Program at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She was previously a technical officer at the World Health Organization with appointments in the departments of Gender and Women’s Health and Health Action in Crises. Over seven years at the WHO her responsibilities included managing the Sexual Violence Research Initiative (SVRI) as well as technical and policy work on gender, sexual violence prevention and response and sexual and reproductive health in humanitarian settings and on humanitarian policy issues including civil military coordination and humanitarian space. Ms. Reis continues to consult for WHO on projects relating to sexual violence including medico-legal aspects. Her current research is on accountability in the international humanitarian system and on sexual violence in conflict settings. She has also served as a Senior Research Associate with Physicians for Human Rights (USA) where her work included studies on sexual violence, children’s rights, women’s rights, HIV & AIDS, and conflict & health.

Christina Clark-Kazak

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor
University of Ottawa, Canada
Research topics
Migration
Agency & Participation
Accountability & Shifting Power
Connect

Christina Clark-Kazak, Phil is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa, and President of the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration. She has previously served as Editor-in-chief of Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, and President of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, she worked for York University (2009-2017), Saint Paul University (2007-2008) and the Canadian government (1999-2007). Her research focuses on age discrimination in migration and development policy, young people’s political participation, and interdisciplinary methodologies in forced migration contexts.

Christina Clark-Kazak, Phil is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa, and President of the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration. She has previously served as Editor-in-chief of Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees, and President of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, she worked for York University (2009-2017), Saint Paul University (2007-2008) and the Canadian government (1999-2007). Her research focuses on age discrimination in migration and development policy, young people’s political participation, and interdisciplinary methodologies in forced migration contexts.

Claire Greene

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health
Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Migration
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

M. Claire Greene, PhD MPH, is an epidemiologist and implementation scientist interested in identifying opportunities to improve population mental health through community- and systems-level interventions. Specifically, her research examines models of integrating mental health and psychosocial support across sectors to enhance the accessibility, relevance, effectiveness, and sustainability of these programs for displaced populations in humanitarian contexts. In her work she consults and collaborates with governments, non-governmental organizations, UN agencies, and academic institutions. At Mailman, Dr. Greene teaches Investigative Methods in Complex Emergencies, a course focused on how to collect and effectively use data to inform programming and policy in humanitarian emergencies. She is faculty within the Program on Forced Migration and Health, a member of the Columbia University Global Mental Health Programs steering committee, and a faculty affiliate of the Columbia Population Research Center.

M. Claire Greene, PhD MPH, is an epidemiologist and implementation scientist interested in identifying opportunities to improve population mental health through community- and systems-level interventions. Specifically, her research examines models of integrating mental health and psychosocial support across sectors to enhance the accessibility, relevance, effectiveness, and sustainability of these programs for displaced populations in humanitarian contexts. In her work she consults and collaborates with governments, non-governmental organizations, UN agencies, and academic institutions. At Mailman, Dr. Greene teaches Investigative Methods in Complex Emergencies, a course focused on how to collect and effectively use data to inform programming and policy in humanitarian emergencies. She is faculty within the Program on Forced Migration and Health, a member of the Columbia University Global Mental Health Programs steering committee, and a faculty affiliate of the Columbia Population Research Center.

Corporación Infancia y Desarrollo (CID)

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Education
Violence
Child Development
Connect

Corporación Infancia y Desarrollo (CID) focuses on building work methodologies, establishing principles of co-responsibility, implementing innovative educational proposals, qualifying projects and training personnel to leave installed capacity in the territories. Their extensive experience opens the doors for social transformation in Colombia. Currently they continue working on building a more equitable Colombia for the populations through the restitution of their rights and the strengthening of their life projects, contributing to peace with social development.

Corporación Infancia y Desarrollo (CID) focuses on building work methodologies, establishing principles of co-responsibility, implementing innovative educational proposals, qualifying projects and training personnel to leave installed capacity in the territories. Their extensive experience opens the doors for social transformation in Colombia. Currently they continue working on building a more equitable Colombia for the populations through the restitution of their rights and the strengthening of their life projects, contributing to peace with social development.

Dario Maldonado

Faculty Affiliate
Associate professor at the School of Government
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Education
Systems Strengthening
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Connect

Maldonado's main areas of research are Public Economics and Social Policies with an emphasis on problems and policies that affect young people. He has carried out theoretical and empirical work and in both cases where he dealt with the design of social policy (education, pensions, taxes and conditional transfers) and the effects of current policies in Colombia (educational policies, conditional transfers, social protection). His research looks closely at the way social policy is structured. He has been involved in several exercises examining the state and results of Colombian public policy in these same areas (through various studies for the Colombian Government, Fundación Compartir and the British Council), which have led to discussions at the national level about the need for policy change and what form the new policy should take. His research has been published in international indexed journals such as the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Health Economics and the Journal of Public Economics among others. He participates as a professor of courses where students develop skills for the design and analysis of public policy. In particular, he is a professor of the Ethics, Justice and Public Policy course where the main theories on justice in public policy are studied with an emphasis on the scope of these theories to think about problems in developing countries. He is an associate editor of the International Journal of Educational Development. Between 2014 and 2021 he was director of research at the School of Government of the Universidad de los Andes.

Maldonado's main areas of research are Public Economics and Social Policies with an emphasis on problems and policies that affect young people. He has carried out theoretical and empirical work and in both cases where he dealt with the design of social policy (education, pensions, taxes and conditional transfers) and the effects of current policies in Colombia (educational policies, conditional transfers, social protection). His research looks closely at the way social policy is structured. He has been involved in several exercises examining the state and results of Colombian public policy in these same areas (through various studies for the Colombian Government, Fundación Compartir and the British Council), which have led to discussions at the national level about the need for policy change and what form the new policy should take. His research has been published in international indexed journals such as the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Human Resources, Journal of Health Economics and the Journal of Public Economics among others. He participates as a professor of courses where students develop skills for the design and analysis of public policy. In particular, he is a professor of the Ethics, Justice and Public Policy course where the main theories on justice in public policy are studied with an emphasis on the scope of these theories to think about problems in developing countries. He is an associate editor of the International Journal of Educational Development. Between 2014 and 2021 he was director of research at the School of Government of the Universidad de los Andes.

Dicky Pelupessy

Faculty Affiliate
Lecturer at the Faculty of Psychology
Universitas Indonesia
Research topics
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Dicky Pelupessy, PhD, is a lecturer at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia with areas of specialisation: social psychology, community psychology, and peace psychology. He received his PhD degree in Community Psychology from Victoria University, Melbourne (Australia). Currently, he is the director of Crisis Center at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia. Once, he worked closely with Center for Child Protection and Wellbeing (or PUSKAPA) at Universitas Indonesia as Technical Lead for Child Protection in Emergencies. He was one of writers who developed UNICEF-supported Child Protection in Emergencies (CPiE) Toolkit in Indonesia. He has extensive and hands-on experience in emergencies in Indonesia and has been one of key resource persons in mental health and psychosocial support in emergencies in Indonesia. He has been appointed as national co-coordinator of psychosocial support sub-cluster. In addition, Dr. Pelupessy is the coordinator of Master of Applied Psychology program with concentration in Social Intervention at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia. He continuously aspires to be a reflective practitioner. He has a great passion as a social interventionist/action researcher working within an ecological framework.

Dicky Pelupessy, PhD, is a lecturer at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia with areas of specialisation: social psychology, community psychology, and peace psychology. He received his PhD degree in Community Psychology from Victoria University, Melbourne (Australia). Currently, he is the director of Crisis Center at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia. Once, he worked closely with Center for Child Protection and Wellbeing (or PUSKAPA) at Universitas Indonesia as Technical Lead for Child Protection in Emergencies. He was one of writers who developed UNICEF-supported Child Protection in Emergencies (CPiE) Toolkit in Indonesia. He has extensive and hands-on experience in emergencies in Indonesia and has been one of key resource persons in mental health and psychosocial support in emergencies in Indonesia. He has been appointed as national co-coordinator of psychosocial support sub-cluster. In addition, Dr. Pelupessy is the coordinator of Master of Applied Psychology program with concentration in Social Intervention at the Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Indonesia. He continuously aspires to be a reflective practitioner. He has a great passion as a social interventionist/action researcher working within an ecological framework.

Diego Ivan Lucumí

Faculty Affiliate
Professor of Health Behavior And Health Education
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Education
Agency & Participation
Connect

Since his training and interest in health education, Diego Ivan Lucumí has worked on public health interventions for more than 15 years, including policies, plans, programs, and projects at the national, territorial, and community levels.  Health behaviors and health education are his area of ​​performance and contribution to public health. His work is focused on the understanding and intervention of social and behavioral factors that influence the health of individuals, groups, communities and society. In particular, his research is oriented towards the design, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions, as well as the analysis of health inequities. His main field of research is related to cardiovascular health and disease, this includes the study and intervention of risk and protective factors, living conditions and structural factors, including public policies.  Another of his areas of interest has to do with the study of the challenges that urbanization and urban contexts have for health and quality of life, especially in intermediate cities, and the development of initiatives to face these challenges. His work is mainly based on the use of mixed and participatory research approaches.

Since his training and interest in health education, Diego Ivan Lucumí has worked on public health interventions for more than 15 years, including policies, plans, programs, and projects at the national, territorial, and community levels.  Health behaviors and health education are his area of ​​performance and contribution to public health. His work is focused on the understanding and intervention of social and behavioral factors that influence the health of individuals, groups, communities and society. In particular, his research is oriented towards the design, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions, as well as the analysis of health inequities. His main field of research is related to cardiovascular health and disease, this includes the study and intervention of risk and protective factors, living conditions and structural factors, including public policies.  Another of his areas of interest has to do with the study of the challenges that urbanization and urban contexts have for health and quality of life, especially in intermediate cities, and the development of initiatives to face these challenges. His work is mainly based on the use of mixed and participatory research approaches.

Dr. Arun Kunwar

Project Collaborator
MBBS (India), MD Psychiatry, Fellowship Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Syracuse, NY, USA
Research topics
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Tools & Training
Connect

Dr. Kunwar is the first child and adolescent psychiatrist of Nepal and champions on advocacy on promotion of mental health of children and adolescents in Nepal, including providing technical support to the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), Gov. of Nepal on the area. Dr. Kunwar helped establish the first and only Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit at Kanti Children's Hospital, where he is the team leader.

Dr. Kunwar has worked with UNHCR on preventing sexual abuse of children in refugee camps. He is the lead contributor to the child section of the “One Stop Crisis Center” training manual that has been adopted by the Gov. of Nepal and presently being rolled out throughout Nepal. He has extensively worked with schools/ community/ NGOs/ MOHP/Government of Nepal to develop and implement community based preventive and promotional MH programs for C&As. Few notable ones are following,

-Child and Adolescent Community Care Package (mhGAP for C&A) approved by MOHP

-Management of COVID related stress for C&A: direct reach to >100,000 C&As and care givers

-School Mental Health Packages for school nurses, currently being rolled out in 120 schools.

Dr Kunwar is the former President of Psychiatrists Association of Nepal. He has been the winner of The Swiss Foundation for World Health/World Health Organization, “Outstanding Achievement in the field of Mental Health Care” 2020.

Dr. Kunwar is the first child and adolescent psychiatrist of Nepal and champions on advocacy on promotion of mental health of children and adolescents in Nepal, including providing technical support to the Ministry of Health and Population (MOHP), Gov. of Nepal on the area. Dr. Kunwar helped establish the first and only Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit at Kanti Children's Hospital, where he is the team leader.

Dr. Kunwar has worked with UNHCR on preventing sexual abuse of children in refugee camps. He is the lead contributor to the child section of the “One Stop Crisis Center” training manual that has been adopted by the Gov. of Nepal and presently being rolled out throughout Nepal. He has extensively worked with schools/ community/ NGOs/ MOHP/Government of Nepal to develop and implement community based preventive and promotional MH programs for C&As. Few notable ones are following,

-Child and Adolescent Community Care Package (mhGAP for C&A) approved by MOHP

-Management of COVID related stress for C&A: direct reach to >100,000 C&As and care givers

-School Mental Health Packages for school nurses, currently being rolled out in 120 schools.

Dr Kunwar is the former President of Psychiatrists Association of Nepal. He has been the winner of The Swiss Foundation for World Health/World Health Organization, “Outstanding Achievement in the field of Mental Health Care” 2020.

Dr. Erum Mariam

Project Collaborator
Executive Director
Institute for Education Development, BRAC University
Research topics
Child Development
Tools & Training
Connect

Dr. Mariam is the executive director of BRAC Institute of Educational Development (IED), BRAC University, in Bangladesh. Dr Mariam completed her PhD in Education from the University of Cambridge in 2008.

She has extensive experience of scaling up education interventions both nationally and globally, and was involved in the expansion of the unique BRAC run Non-Formal Primary (NFP) Schools in the 1990s.

Since 2008, Dr Mariam has promoted BRAC IED’s vision of contributing to the improvement of quality, equity, and efficiency in the education system in partnership with the public sector.

The globally recognized Play Labs and Humanitarian Play Labs have been developed under her leadership, focusing on early stimulation and children’s wellbeing in diverse settings.

Dr. Mariam is the executive director of BRAC Institute of Educational Development (IED), BRAC University, in Bangladesh. Dr Mariam completed her PhD in Education from the University of Cambridge in 2008.

She has extensive experience of scaling up education interventions both nationally and globally, and was involved in the expansion of the unique BRAC run Non-Formal Primary (NFP) Schools in the 1990s.

Since 2008, Dr Mariam has promoted BRAC IED’s vision of contributing to the improvement of quality, equity, and efficiency in the education system in partnership with the public sector.

The globally recognized Play Labs and Humanitarian Play Labs have been developed under her leadership, focusing on early stimulation and children’s wellbeing in diverse settings.

Dr. Lawrence Eron

Project Collaborator
Dean of the Faculty of Special Needs and Rehabilitation
Kyambogo University
Research topics
Child Development
Education
Tools & Training
Connect

Dr. Lawrence Eron has been a Lecturer (Hearing Impairment/Inclusive Education) at the University since 1998. He holds a PhD degree from the University of Oslo, Norway. Dr. Eron initiated and chaired the Institutional Disability Policy for Kyambogo University to ensure Disability Inclusion in Higher Education.

Dr. Eron has coordinated the East and Southern African Regional Project on “Human Resource Development for Inclusive Education in Botswana, Swaziland, Kenya and Uganda” - an ACP funded project in collaboration with Roehampton University. He has also worked in partnership with Child-to-Child programme to initiate a proposal and implement a project to Eliminate Child Labour through Education by Kyambogo University in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation. Dr.Eron has been a contact person for Uganda National Institute of Special Education (UNISE) on a DANIDA funded project developing special needs education institutional training and decentralized programmes (SNE /EARS).

Dr.Eron was part of the team that initiated the East African Institutional Special Needs, Inclusive Education and Rehabilitation Linkage between Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi. He worked in partnership with the Norwegian Association for the Disabled, the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development and District Community Based Programmes to develop a CBR approach to Inclusive Education in Tororo, Busia and Kayunga districts. He is also the national coordinator of REACH FORWARD- Making Educational Research count for children with disabilities, in Malawi, Kenya and Uganda - a collaborative research project between the University of Birmingham, Kyambogo University, Kenya Institute of Special Education and Montfort College Malawi supported by Sight Savers International.Dr. Eron has a vast experience as a consultant in the field of inclusive education, e.g. for Cheshire Services - Uganda (Training of teachers), University of Rwanda – Curriculum development, ACP/EDULINK Project Training Manual on inclusive education, Plan Uganda–Developing a Community Based Rehabilitation Training Manual, Norwegian Association of the Disabled, UNESCO, etc.

Dr. Lawrence Eron has been a Lecturer (Hearing Impairment/Inclusive Education) at the University since 1998. He holds a PhD degree from the University of Oslo, Norway. Dr. Eron initiated and chaired the Institutional Disability Policy for Kyambogo University to ensure Disability Inclusion in Higher Education.

Dr. Eron has coordinated the East and Southern African Regional Project on “Human Resource Development for Inclusive Education in Botswana, Swaziland, Kenya and Uganda” - an ACP funded project in collaboration with Roehampton University. He has also worked in partnership with Child-to-Child programme to initiate a proposal and implement a project to Eliminate Child Labour through Education by Kyambogo University in collaboration with the International Labour Organisation. Dr.Eron has been a contact person for Uganda National Institute of Special Education (UNISE) on a DANIDA funded project developing special needs education institutional training and decentralized programmes (SNE /EARS).

Dr.Eron was part of the team that initiated the East African Institutional Special Needs, Inclusive Education and Rehabilitation Linkage between Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi. He worked in partnership with the Norwegian Association for the Disabled, the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development and District Community Based Programmes to develop a CBR approach to Inclusive Education in Tororo, Busia and Kayunga districts. He is also the national coordinator of REACH FORWARD- Making Educational Research count for children with disabilities, in Malawi, Kenya and Uganda - a collaborative research project between the University of Birmingham, Kyambogo University, Kenya Institute of Special Education and Montfort College Malawi supported by Sight Savers International.Dr. Eron has a vast experience as a consultant in the field of inclusive education, e.g. for Cheshire Services - Uganda (Training of teachers), University of Rwanda – Curriculum development, ACP/EDULINK Project Training Manual on inclusive education, Plan Uganda–Developing a Community Based Rehabilitation Training Manual, Norwegian Association of the Disabled, UNESCO, etc.

Dr. Olido Kenneth

Faculty Affiliate
Faculty of Business and Development Studies
Gulu University
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Connect

Kenneth holds a PhD and MSC in Marketing from Gulu University. His research interests are in business management, marketing, procurement and statistics. Dr. Olido started his career with Gulu University in 2002 as a Teaching Assistant. Currently he is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Marketing, Entrepreneurship and Procurement Management at the same university.

Dr. Olido has collaborated with AfriChild Centre as a Trainer in quantitative data analysis in a program for training inter-university senior researchers from 7 universities in Uganda.

Work with VACS data
Dr. Olido's research project focuses on assessing the association between adverse childhood experience and risks of HIV infection among adolescents aged 13 to 24.

Kenneth holds a PhD and MSC in Marketing from Gulu University. His research interests are in business management, marketing, procurement and statistics. Dr. Olido started his career with Gulu University in 2002 as a Teaching Assistant. Currently he is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Marketing, Entrepreneurship and Procurement Management at the same university.

Dr. Olido has collaborated with AfriChild Centre as a Trainer in quantitative data analysis in a program for training inter-university senior researchers from 7 universities in Uganda.

Work with VACS data
Dr. Olido's research project focuses on assessing the association between adverse childhood experience and risks of HIV infection among adolescents aged 13 to 24.

Ecole Nationale des Travailleurs Sociaux Spécialisés (ENTSS)

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Tools & Training
Systems Strengthening
Connect

This website is the tool that will allow the ENTSS to be everywhere, all the time! It is with this in mind that this platform is set up by the National School of Specialized Social Workers (ENTSS) to communicate with decision-makers, national and international partners, pupils and students, the general public in Dakar and abroad.

This website is the tool that will allow the ENTSS to be everywhere, all the time! It is with this in mind that this platform is set up by the National School of Specialized Social Workers (ENTSS) to communicate with decision-makers, national and international partners, pupils and students, the general public in Dakar and abroad.

Elizabeth Letourneau

Faculty Affiliate
Professor at the Department of Mental Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Research topics
Violence
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Connect

Elizabeth J. Letourneau, Ph.D. is a Professor, Department of Mental Health, and Director, Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). She has focused her career on developing and evaluating child sexual abuse prevention policy and practice. As inaugural director of the Moore Center, Dr. Letourneau’s efforts include developing and evaluating child sexual abuse prevention interventions that target adolescents, parents, and youth serving organizations. She is also leading an evaluation of federal policy impacts on violence prevention, and a large-scale project to develop more effective methods for communicating about child sexual abuse as a preventable public health problem. Her work has been widely reported in high impact media, including This American Life, TEDMED, PBS News Hour, NPR’s On Point, Psychology Today, and The New Yorker.  Dr. Letourneau’s research findings establishing the inefficacy and harmfulness of juvenile sex offense registration policies was influential in three U.S. state supreme court cases and cited by several state legislatures in support of revising these policies. This policy work was recognized by JHSPH, which awarded Dr. Letourneau its inaugural Faculty Practice Award in 2017. Dr. Letourneau is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Forum on Global Violence Prevention, the National Coalition to Prevention Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, the ITU UNESCO Broadband Commission Working Group on Child Safety Online. She previously served on the World Health Organization Guidelines Develop Group to Establish Clinical Guidelines for Responding to Sexual Abuse or Sexual Assault of Children and Adolescents.

Elizabeth J. Letourneau, Ph.D. is a Professor, Department of Mental Health, and Director, Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). She has focused her career on developing and evaluating child sexual abuse prevention policy and practice. As inaugural director of the Moore Center, Dr. Letourneau’s efforts include developing and evaluating child sexual abuse prevention interventions that target adolescents, parents, and youth serving organizations. She is also leading an evaluation of federal policy impacts on violence prevention, and a large-scale project to develop more effective methods for communicating about child sexual abuse as a preventable public health problem. Her work has been widely reported in high impact media, including This American Life, TEDMED, PBS News Hour, NPR’s On Point, Psychology Today, and The New Yorker.  Dr. Letourneau’s research findings establishing the inefficacy and harmfulness of juvenile sex offense registration policies was influential in three U.S. state supreme court cases and cited by several state legislatures in support of revising these policies. This policy work was recognized by JHSPH, which awarded Dr. Letourneau its inaugural Faculty Practice Award in 2017. Dr. Letourneau is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Forum on Global Violence Prevention, the National Coalition to Prevention Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation, the ITU UNESCO Broadband Commission Working Group on Child Safety Online. She previously served on the World Health Organization Guidelines Develop Group to Establish Clinical Guidelines for Responding to Sexual Abuse or Sexual Assault of Children and Adolescents.

Elizabeth Patiño

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Child Development
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Connect

Enrique Chaux

Faculty Affiliate
Full Professor in the Department of Psychology
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Education
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Violence
Connect

Since his training and interest in health education, Chaux has worked on public health interventions for more than 15 years, including policies, plans, programs, and projects at the national, territorial, and community levels.  Health behaviors and health education are his area of ​​performance and contribution to public health. His work is focused on the understanding and intervention of social and behavioral factors that influence the health of individuals, groups, communities and society. In particular, her research is oriented towards the design, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions, as well as the analysis of health inequities. Her main field of research is related to cardiovascular health and disease, this includes the study and intervention of risk and protective factors, living conditions and structural factors, including public policies.  Another of his areas of interest has to do with the study of the challenges that urbanization and urban contexts have for health and quality of life, especially in intermediate cities, and the development of initiatives to face these challenges. His work is mainly based on the use of mixed and participatory research approaches.

Since his training and interest in health education, Chaux has worked on public health interventions for more than 15 years, including policies, plans, programs, and projects at the national, territorial, and community levels.  Health behaviors and health education are his area of ​​performance and contribution to public health. His work is focused on the understanding and intervention of social and behavioral factors that influence the health of individuals, groups, communities and society. In particular, her research is oriented towards the design, implementation and evaluation of public health interventions, as well as the analysis of health inequities. Her main field of research is related to cardiovascular health and disease, this includes the study and intervention of risk and protective factors, living conditions and structural factors, including public policies.  Another of his areas of interest has to do with the study of the challenges that urbanization and urban contexts have for health and quality of life, especially in intermediate cities, and the development of initiatives to face these challenges. His work is mainly based on the use of mixed and participatory research approaches.

Firman Witoelar Kartaadipoetra

Faculty Affiliate
School of Leadership Studies at Royal Roads University
Australian National University
Research topics
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Education
Gender
Connect

Firman Witoelar Kartaadipoetra, PhD is a Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. Previously, he was the Research Director of SurveyMeter, a research organization based in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Witoelar’s research interest is in the area of development microeconomics, focusing on studying health behavior and outcomes, long term consequences of human capital formation, survey design and methodology, and project evaluations. In the past 10 years, Witoelar has been intimately involved with the development and implementation of the last two rounds of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS4 and IFLS5) as one of the Co-Principal Investigators. The IFLS is a longitudinal multi-purpose publicly-available household survey, funded by the United States National Institute of Aging (NIA) and National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD). Covering a period of 21 years, IFLS is one of the highest quality panel data sets in the developing world, and one of the longest. His international fieldwork experience include providing technical advice in setting up longitudinal household surveys supported by the World Bank in Tanzania and Uganda. Recently, Witoelar led SurveyMeter in a partnership with the University of Indonesia’s Center on Child Protection and Well-being (PUSKAPA) and the Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture to establish the groundwork for a longitudinal study on the experiences of Indonesian children and their families in order to understand the long-term effects of early childhood adversity.

Firman Witoelar Kartaadipoetra, PhD is a Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. Previously, he was the Research Director of SurveyMeter, a research organization based in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Witoelar’s research interest is in the area of development microeconomics, focusing on studying health behavior and outcomes, long term consequences of human capital formation, survey design and methodology, and project evaluations. In the past 10 years, Witoelar has been intimately involved with the development and implementation of the last two rounds of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS4 and IFLS5) as one of the Co-Principal Investigators. The IFLS is a longitudinal multi-purpose publicly-available household survey, funded by the United States National Institute of Aging (NIA) and National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD). Covering a period of 21 years, IFLS is one of the highest quality panel data sets in the developing world, and one of the longest. His international fieldwork experience include providing technical advice in setting up longitudinal household surveys supported by the World Bank in Tanzania and Uganda. Recently, Witoelar led SurveyMeter in a partnership with the University of Indonesia’s Center on Child Protection and Well-being (PUSKAPA) and the Indonesian Ministry of Education and Culture to establish the groundwork for a longitudinal study on the experiences of Indonesian children and their families in order to understand the long-term effects of early childhood adversity.

Fred Ssewamala

Faculty Affiliate
Professor of Social Work and Public Health
Washington University in St. Louis
Research topics
Child Development
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Connect

Fred Ssewamala is Professor of Social Work and Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis and the Founding Director of the International Center for Child Health and Development (ICHAD). Founded at Columbia University where Ssewamala was on the faculty for the past 15 years as a tenured faculty member (2003-2017), ICHAD contributes to the reduction of poverty and improvement of health outcomes for children, adolescent youth and families in low-resource communities, particularly those in SSA. The center moved to the Brown School at Washington University when Ssewamala joined the faculty in July 2017. In the past 15 years, Ssewamala has been the Principal Investigator on multiple research grants funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIMH and NICHD), and several foundation-funded research grants. His research focuses on advancing and broadening knowledge about social protection, and innovative asset development and economic strengthening interventions, including children savings/development accounts aimed at improving the developmental outcomes and life chances of marginalized and vulnerable children and youth, including those affected by HIV/AIDS. His academic work has been published in the Lancet, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Adolescent Health, Prevention Science, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, and Social Service Review. Ssewamala holds a Masters and PhD in Social Work, with a focus on social and economic development policy, from Washington University in St. Louis.

Fred Ssewamala is Professor of Social Work and Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis and the Founding Director of the International Center for Child Health and Development (ICHAD). Founded at Columbia University where Ssewamala was on the faculty for the past 15 years as a tenured faculty member (2003-2017), ICHAD contributes to the reduction of poverty and improvement of health outcomes for children, adolescent youth and families in low-resource communities, particularly those in SSA. The center moved to the Brown School at Washington University when Ssewamala joined the faculty in July 2017. In the past 15 years, Ssewamala has been the Principal Investigator on multiple research grants funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIMH and NICHD), and several foundation-funded research grants. His research focuses on advancing and broadening knowledge about social protection, and innovative asset development and economic strengthening interventions, including children savings/development accounts aimed at improving the developmental outcomes and life chances of marginalized and vulnerable children and youth, including those affected by HIV/AIDS. His academic work has been published in the Lancet, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Adolescent Health, Prevention Science, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, and Social Service Review. Ssewamala holds a Masters and PhD in Social Work, with a focus on social and economic development policy, from Washington University in St. Louis.

Fred Wabwire Mangen

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor at the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Makerere University School of Public Health
Research topics
Tools & Training
Sexual & Reproductive Health
Connect

Dr. Fred Wabwire-Mangen was trained in Medicine at Makerere University, in Tropical Medicine at Liverpool University and in Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University where he obtained his PhD. Dr. Wabwire-Mangen has over 30 years of conducting research on endemic, emerging and reemerging diseases of public health importance in Uganda including malaria, STIs, HIV/AIDS, influenza and other emerging viral infections. He also has demonstrated experience as a senior research scientist in leading and managing multi-disciplinary research teams .He is currently the Executive Director, Regional Centre for Quality Assurance .  Prof.Mangen also trains African professionals to design and manage programs that treat people with HIV or AIDS as well as education programs to prevent infection. He has initiated public health collaboratives among such institutions as Makerere University, Tulane University, and the Rockefeller Foundation .Besides, Prof. Mangen was a key figure in implementing public health without borders education strategy in Africa.

Dr. Fred Wabwire-Mangen was trained in Medicine at Makerere University, in Tropical Medicine at Liverpool University and in Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University where he obtained his PhD. Dr. Wabwire-Mangen has over 30 years of conducting research on endemic, emerging and reemerging diseases of public health importance in Uganda including malaria, STIs, HIV/AIDS, influenza and other emerging viral infections. He also has demonstrated experience as a senior research scientist in leading and managing multi-disciplinary research teams .He is currently the Executive Director, Regional Centre for Quality Assurance .  Prof.Mangen also trains African professionals to design and manage programs that treat people with HIV or AIDS as well as education programs to prevent infection. He has initiated public health collaboratives among such institutions as Makerere University, Tulane University, and the Rockefeller Foundation .Besides, Prof. Mangen was a key figure in implementing public health without borders education strategy in Africa.

Fundación SEPA

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Research Methods
Child Development
Connect

Fundación SEPA focuses its capacities on overcoming the historical and socio-cultural exclusion that makes children, adolescents and youth invisible, or considers them objects of control, denying them the exercise of their civil rights for considering them "minors".

Fundación SEPA focuses its capacities on overcoming the historical and socio-cultural exclusion that makes children, adolescents and youth invisible, or considers them objects of control, denying them the exercise of their civil rights for considering them "minors".

Gameela Samarasinghe

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor in Psychology in the Department of Sociology
University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
Research topics
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Connect

Gameela Samarasinghe, PhD is a clinical Psychologist by training. She initiated the design of and introduced the Postgraduate Diploma and Master’s in Counselling and Psychosocial Support at the Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Colombo. These postgraduate programs try to provoke thinking on alternative visions of what support to individuals and communities might look like while at the same time providing training on conventional counselling skills. She is the Coordinator of both programs. She has been a member of various advisory groups developing strategies for post-conflict trauma in Sri Lanka and internationally. These include her role as Technical Advisor to the Asia Foundation’s Reducing the Effects and Incidents of Trauma (RESIST) Program and to the Victims of Trauma Treatment Program (VTTP), which are programs designed to support and treat torture survivors. She was a member of the international research team on “Trauma, Peace building and Development”, run from the University of Ulster. She has written extensively on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing in Sri Lanka. She has been awarded many fellowships and has been the recipient of research grants including the Fulbright-Hays Senior Research Scholar Award (2004 – 2005) at Boston University and the Fulbright Advanced Research Award (2013 – 2014) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Gameela Samarasinghe, PhD is a clinical Psychologist by training. She initiated the design of and introduced the Postgraduate Diploma and Master’s in Counselling and Psychosocial Support at the Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Colombo. These postgraduate programs try to provoke thinking on alternative visions of what support to individuals and communities might look like while at the same time providing training on conventional counselling skills. She is the Coordinator of both programs. She has been a member of various advisory groups developing strategies for post-conflict trauma in Sri Lanka and internationally. These include her role as Technical Advisor to the Asia Foundation’s Reducing the Effects and Incidents of Trauma (RESIST) Program and to the Victims of Trauma Treatment Program (VTTP), which are programs designed to support and treat torture survivors. She was a member of the international research team on “Trauma, Peace building and Development”, run from the University of Ulster. She has written extensively on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing in Sri Lanka. She has been awarded many fellowships and has been the recipient of research grants including the Fulbright-Hays Senior Research Scholar Award (2004 – 2005) at Boston University and the Fulbright Advanced Research Award (2013 – 2014) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Hanna-Tina Fischer

Faculty Affiliate
Postdoctoral Research Scientist
Charité Center for Global Health, Charité Universitätsmediz
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Connect

Hanna-Tina Fischer holds a Doctorate in Public Health, DrPH in Leadership in Global Health and Humanitarian Systems, from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Her doctoral work focused on social determinants of health, investigating the impact of adversity on children’s well-being and analyzing risk as a function of family level system adaptation to crises. Dr. Fischer has over 15 years' experience working on issues of child welfare and violence prevention in low- and lower-middle income countries. She has led post-disaster needs assessments in Thailand and Bangladesh, implemented psychosocial support programs in Pakistan-administered Kashmir and family tracing and reunification programs for children affected by natural disasters in the Philippines. In Africa, Dr. Fischer has worked on programs to support children associated with armed forces in South Sudan, refugee children in Dadaab, Kenya, and unaccompanied minors in South Africa and Zimbabwe. She also has experience of working with refugee populations in Germany and earthquake affected populations in L’Aquila, Italy.

Dr. Fischer is currently a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the Charité Center for Global Health, Charité Universitätsmediz in Berlin, Germany, where she is conducting a health policy analysis of the adoption and implementation of non-pharmaceutical interventions in Ghana during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Prior to the Charité, she worked at the Center for International Health Protection, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), leading a study that assessed the resilience of health systems in Guinea and Sierra Leone during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Fischer has also worked with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and was an Associate of the Department for Forced Migration and Health at Columbia University. Born in Botswana and raised in India and Pakistan, she has a BA in Anthropology and Communication Studies from Goldsmiths’, University of London and an MSc in Development Management from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Hanna-Tina Fischer holds a Doctorate in Public Health, DrPH in Leadership in Global Health and Humanitarian Systems, from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Her doctoral work focused on social determinants of health, investigating the impact of adversity on children’s well-being and analyzing risk as a function of family level system adaptation to crises. Dr. Fischer has over 15 years' experience working on issues of child welfare and violence prevention in low- and lower-middle income countries. She has led post-disaster needs assessments in Thailand and Bangladesh, implemented psychosocial support programs in Pakistan-administered Kashmir and family tracing and reunification programs for children affected by natural disasters in the Philippines. In Africa, Dr. Fischer has worked on programs to support children associated with armed forces in South Sudan, refugee children in Dadaab, Kenya, and unaccompanied minors in South Africa and Zimbabwe. She also has experience of working with refugee populations in Germany and earthquake affected populations in L’Aquila, Italy.

Dr. Fischer is currently a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the Charité Center for Global Health, Charité Universitätsmediz in Berlin, Germany, where she is conducting a health policy analysis of the adoption and implementation of non-pharmaceutical interventions in Ghana during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Prior to the Charité, she worked at the Center for International Health Protection, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), leading a study that assessed the resilience of health systems in Guinea and Sierra Leone during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Fischer has also worked with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and was an Associate of the Department for Forced Migration and Health at Columbia University. Born in Botswana and raised in India and Pakistan, she has a BA in Anthropology and Communication Studies from Goldsmiths’, University of London and an MSc in Development Management from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

Harold Villalba

Project Collaborator
Knowledge Management Specialist
Imagina
Research topics
Connect

Harold Villalba is a specialist in Knowledge Management and Learning at the Inter-American Development specializes in Knowledge Management and Learning at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). He works on measuring the effectiveness of the knowledge generated by the IDB and curating sectoral knowledge to enhance the bank's operational impact. Additionally, Harold is involved in developing knowledge management tools that leverage artificial intelligence.

Harold Villalba is a specialist in Knowledge Management and Learning at the Inter-American Development specializes in Knowledge Management and Learning at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). He works on measuring the effectiveness of the knowledge generated by the IDB and curating sectoral knowledge to enhance the bank's operational impact. Additionally, Harold is involved in developing knowledge management tools that leverage artificial intelligence.

Imagina, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Partner Research Center
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Child Development
Violence
Systems Strengthening
Connect

Imagina is a multidisciplinary collaboration platform that seeks to impact the well-being of children and adolescents through research, communication, capacity development, and advocacy in public policy involving children and young people.

Imagina is a multidisciplinary collaboration platform that seeks to impact the well-being of children and adolescents through research, communication, capacity development, and advocacy in public policy involving children and young people.

Institut National de Formation Sociale (INFS)

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Tools & Training
Connect

The National Institute of Social Training is a Public Establishment of an administrative nature; it has legal personality and financial autonomy. The National Institute of Social Training is a member of the Association for Social Education in Africa (AESA), and a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (AIESS). The post-baccalaureate education it provides should give it the status of a Grande Ecole.


INFS's mission is to ensure the initial and continuous training of social workers and Social Affairs executives and carry out research actions in the fields of pedagogy and social intervention techniques.

The National Institute of Social Training is a Public Establishment of an administrative nature; it has legal personality and financial autonomy. The National Institute of Social Training is a member of the Association for Social Education in Africa (AESA), and a member of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (AIESS). The post-baccalaureate education it provides should give it the status of a Grande Ecole.


INFS's mission is to ensure the initial and continuous training of social workers and Social Affairs executives and carry out research actions in the fields of pedagogy and social intervention techniques.

Institut National de Formation en Travail Social (INFTS)

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Tools & Training
Connect

The National Institute for Training in Social Work (INFTS) is the official state structure in charge of initial and continuing training, development and retraining of personnel in the field of social work as well as applied research in social work. . To do this, it develops and implements training programs relating to the advancement of gender, women and social protection.

The National Institute for Training in Social Work (INFTS) is the official state structure in charge of initial and continuing training, development and retraining of personnel in the field of social work as well as applied research in social work. . To do this, it develops and implements training programs relating to the advancement of gender, women and social protection.

Institut Supérieur des Sciences de la Population (ISSP)

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Education
Child Labor
Connect

The ISSP is a university institute. As such, it benefits from a more effective management system and more efficient reorganization. The institute is administered by a Director assisted by a Deputy Director in charge of Academic and Scientific Affairs.

Its deliberative bodies are: the Management Council, the Scientific Council, the Assembly of Training or Research Units. The Training or Research Units include researchers, teacher-researchers from the ISSP and other structures of the Joseph KI-ZERBO University who are interested and competent in the subject.

The ISSP is a university institute. As such, it benefits from a more effective management system and more efficient reorganization. The institute is administered by a Director assisted by a Deputy Director in charge of Academic and Scientific Affairs.

Its deliberative bodies are: the Management Council, the Scientific Council, the Assembly of Training or Research Units. The Training or Research Units include researchers, teacher-researchers from the ISSP and other structures of the Joseph KI-ZERBO University who are interested and competent in the subject.

Instituto Liberta

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Connect

A social organization that works to end all sexual violence against children and adolescents through communication and awareness.

Sexual crimes have something in common: invisibility and the fact that they are a structural problem in our society. However, it is important to know that each sexual violence against children and adolescents has different characteristics. Therefore, understanding in depth and communicating about this topic with clarity and specificity is essential.

A social organization that works to end all sexual violence against children and adolescents through communication and awareness.

Sexual crimes have something in common: invisibility and the fact that they are a structural problem in our society. However, it is important to know that each sexual violence against children and adolescents has different characteristics. Therefore, understanding in depth and communicating about this topic with clarity and specificity is essential.

Ismael Ddumba Nyanzi

Project Collaborator
Research, Measurement and Evaluation Specialist
USAID
Research topics
Violence
Child Development
Research Methods
Connect

Before joining the USAID-funded MEASURE Evaluation project and subsequently the D4I project, the Ismael Ddumba Nyanzi worked in collaboration with the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, dedicating efforts to research and evaluation within the realm of child care and protection. Direct engagement with stakeholders at both national and district levels aimed to enhance routine data collection and utilization. Through this experience, the realization dawned that building or enhancing capacity for data collection and usage is a nuanced process, necessitating a thorough understanding of diverse stakeholder perspectives.

The approach involved delving into the reasons behind the lack of data collection and utilization, subsequently collaborating with providers and decision-makers to address the underlying issues. Solutions ranged from behavioral and organizational aspects to technical considerations, requiring a comprehensive examination of various factors. The objective was to navigate through a web of challenges and barriers, facilitating a collective path forward. Ensuring access to essential tools and institutional support emerged as crucial components in the ability to produce and utilize data effectively.

Nyanzi's involvement extended to the introduction of participatory data reviews, a practice widely adopted in the health sector for monitoring HIV care and treatment progress. This approach, relatively new in the field of child care system reform, revealed a scarcity of routine data collection and review practices for children in alternative care across many countries.

In Uganda, inadequate capacity existed at both district and national levels for aggregating, analyzing, visualizing, and facilitating the review and interpretation of data. Despite this, the recognition of data's value in decisions related to care system reform was growing. The commitment persisted in supporting the Ugandan Ministry of Gender, Labour, and Social Development (MGLSD) to enhance administrative data collection, reporting, and usage. This encompassed integrating routine alternative care data into the annual budgeting and planning processes. The foundation laid by D4I aimed to foster increased data use, contributing to improved processes, information systems, and staff and resource coordination for monitoring the country's child care system reform.

Contributing to the transformation of care for children stood out as one of Nyanzi's most significant life privileges. The experience underscored the importance of patience, innovative thinking, and flexibility. Respect for the MGLSD and other collaborators, coupled with appreciation for their insights into needs, effective efforts, and essential steps for progress, defined the approach to this vital endeavor.


Before joining the USAID-funded MEASURE Evaluation project and subsequently the D4I project, the Ismael Ddumba Nyanzi worked in collaboration with the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, dedicating efforts to research and evaluation within the realm of child care and protection. Direct engagement with stakeholders at both national and district levels aimed to enhance routine data collection and utilization. Through this experience, the realization dawned that building or enhancing capacity for data collection and usage is a nuanced process, necessitating a thorough understanding of diverse stakeholder perspectives.

The approach involved delving into the reasons behind the lack of data collection and utilization, subsequently collaborating with providers and decision-makers to address the underlying issues. Solutions ranged from behavioral and organizational aspects to technical considerations, requiring a comprehensive examination of various factors. The objective was to navigate through a web of challenges and barriers, facilitating a collective path forward. Ensuring access to essential tools and institutional support emerged as crucial components in the ability to produce and utilize data effectively.

Nyanzi's involvement extended to the introduction of participatory data reviews, a practice widely adopted in the health sector for monitoring HIV care and treatment progress. This approach, relatively new in the field of child care system reform, revealed a scarcity of routine data collection and review practices for children in alternative care across many countries.

In Uganda, inadequate capacity existed at both district and national levels for aggregating, analyzing, visualizing, and facilitating the review and interpretation of data. Despite this, the recognition of data's value in decisions related to care system reform was growing. The commitment persisted in supporting the Ugandan Ministry of Gender, Labour, and Social Development (MGLSD) to enhance administrative data collection, reporting, and usage. This encompassed integrating routine alternative care data into the annual budgeting and planning processes. The foundation laid by D4I aimed to foster increased data use, contributing to improved processes, information systems, and staff and resource coordination for monitoring the country's child care system reform.

Contributing to the transformation of care for children stood out as one of Nyanzi's most significant life privileges. The experience underscored the importance of patience, innovative thinking, and flexibility. Respect for the MGLSD and other collaborators, coupled with appreciation for their insights into needs, effective efforts, and essential steps for progress, defined the approach to this vital endeavor.


Jessica Taft

Faculty Affiliate
Professor
University of California Santa Cruz
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Connect

jessica Taft is Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz and the Faculty Director of the Dolores Huerta Research Center for the Americas. Rooted in critical interdisciplinary approaches to child and youth studies, Dr. Taft’s research focuses on young people’s contributions to social change through activism and social
movements in North and South America. Building on nearly twenty years of research with young activists, she is increasingly focused on these young people’s encounters with adult-run political institutions and the various programs that seek to include them in policy-making. In this vein, she is currently working on a book project that looks at the history of how children’s
political participation has been imagined, produced, and institutionalized within the child rights sphere.

She is the author of Rebel Girls: Youth Activism and Social Change Across the Americas (NYU Press, 2011), The Kids Are in Charge: Activism and Power in Peru’s Movement of Working Children (NYU Press, 2019), and numerous journal articles on children’s participation, youth politics, and critical civic engagement. Dr. Taft is part of a variety of local, national, and
international collaborative projects focused on child and youth participation and has worked with funders and non governmental organizations to deepen their analysis of the challenges and possibilities of meaningful engagement with young people.

jessica Taft is Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz and the Faculty Director of the Dolores Huerta Research Center for the Americas. Rooted in critical interdisciplinary approaches to child and youth studies, Dr. Taft’s research focuses on young people’s contributions to social change through activism and social
movements in North and South America. Building on nearly twenty years of research with young activists, she is increasingly focused on these young people’s encounters with adult-run political institutions and the various programs that seek to include them in policy-making. In this vein, she is currently working on a book project that looks at the history of how children’s
political participation has been imagined, produced, and institutionalized within the child rights sphere.

She is the author of Rebel Girls: Youth Activism and Social Change Across the Americas (NYU Press, 2011), The Kids Are in Charge: Activism and Power in Peru’s Movement of Working Children (NYU Press, 2019), and numerous journal articles on children’s participation, youth politics, and critical civic engagement. Dr. Taft is part of a variety of local, national, and
international collaborative projects focused on child and youth participation and has worked with funders and non governmental organizations to deepen their analysis of the challenges and possibilities of meaningful engagement with young people.

Juan Camilo González

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant teacher
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Arts
Connect

González holds a PhD in art, design and media from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, with a thesis in data visualization. He holds a master's degree in Animation and Digital Arts from the University of Southern California and a visual artist from the Javeriana University. He has dedicated himself to the creation of animated films, interactive pieces for the Internet and physical computing. He is co-founder of the curatorship and visibility group for Latin American animation Moebius Animación (http://moebiusanimacion.com/). His creations have been exhibited in Colombia, Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Poland, the United States and China. He currently directs the EnFlujo Laboratory of Digital Narratives https://enflujo.com

His work is located at points of convergence: traditional animation and data, cinema and creative programming, physical computing and drawing, the archive and current events, curatorship and critical writing. He is an assistant professor at Ceper and currently directs the EnFlujo Digital Narratives laboratory.

González holds a PhD in art, design and media from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, with a thesis in data visualization. He holds a master's degree in Animation and Digital Arts from the University of Southern California and a visual artist from the Javeriana University. He has dedicated himself to the creation of animated films, interactive pieces for the Internet and physical computing. He is co-founder of the curatorship and visibility group for Latin American animation Moebius Animación (http://moebiusanimacion.com/). His creations have been exhibited in Colombia, Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Poland, the United States and China. He currently directs the EnFlujo Laboratory of Digital Narratives https://enflujo.com

His work is located at points of convergence: traditional animation and data, cinema and creative programming, physical computing and drawing, the archive and current events, curatorship and critical writing. He is an assistant professor at Ceper and currently directs the EnFlujo Digital Narratives laboratory.

Juliana Bol

Faculty Affiliate
Associate professor
Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Migration
Connect

Juliana is relatively new to the CPC Learning Network. As an associate professor at the Mailman School of Public Health, she currently teaches Public Health and Humanitarian Action (PHHA), which delves into a ‘contested humanitarianism.’ Juliana is keen to examine the critical questions, and assumptions underpinning humanitarian response in the short term, and development… in the long run. This is with a view to progressively improve the approaches, programs, and policies we use to effectively reduce inequities. Juliana’s prior work experience was in maternal and child health; she spent 5 years working in health systems strengthening programs in South Sudan, aimed at reducing maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Her primary focus has been on identifying methods to evaluate large scale programs, using routine or observational data. Understanding that children’s health and wellbeing does not accrue merely due to the absence of disease or infirmity, she is keen to apply these approaches within the CPC. Juliana speaks English and Kiswahili and is still trying to figure out the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything.

Juliana is relatively new to the CPC Learning Network. As an associate professor at the Mailman School of Public Health, she currently teaches Public Health and Humanitarian Action (PHHA), which delves into a ‘contested humanitarianism.’ Juliana is keen to examine the critical questions, and assumptions underpinning humanitarian response in the short term, and development… in the long run. This is with a view to progressively improve the approaches, programs, and policies we use to effectively reduce inequities. Juliana’s prior work experience was in maternal and child health; she spent 5 years working in health systems strengthening programs in South Sudan, aimed at reducing maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Her primary focus has been on identifying methods to evaluate large scale programs, using routine or observational data. Understanding that children’s health and wellbeing does not accrue merely due to the absence of disease or infirmity, she is keen to apply these approaches within the CPC. Juliana speaks English and Kiswahili and is still trying to figure out the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything.

Laura Miller-Graff

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor of Psychology and Peace Studies
University of Notre Dame.
Research topics
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Laura Miller-Graff, PhD is Assistant Professor of Psychology and Peace Studies and a core faculty member of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. She earned a Ph.D. in clinical science from the University of Michigan in 2013. Working within an ecological framework, Miller-Graff’s research seeks to understand how various systems (i.e. individual, family, and community) interact to promote or inhibit healthful development following violence exposure. With a focus on children who have multiple traumatic exposures, she investigates resulting patterns of resilience and psychopathology, including the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms. In addition to conducting basic research on the effects of violence on development, Miller-Graff also seeks to identify effective intervention practices for children and families affected by violence. This line of work considers the status of psychosocial interventions currently available in international conflict settings and seeks to identify evidence-based intervention practices that facilitate resilience in families and communities. Specific aims of this work include identifying culturally appropriate assessment and treatment practices and developing efficacious and cost-effective psychosocial interventions that can be readily disseminated in conflict settings.

Laura Miller-Graff, PhD is Assistant Professor of Psychology and Peace Studies and a core faculty member of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. She earned a Ph.D. in clinical science from the University of Michigan in 2013. Working within an ecological framework, Miller-Graff’s research seeks to understand how various systems (i.e. individual, family, and community) interact to promote or inhibit healthful development following violence exposure. With a focus on children who have multiple traumatic exposures, she investigates resulting patterns of resilience and psychopathology, including the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms. In addition to conducting basic research on the effects of violence on development, Miller-Graff also seeks to identify effective intervention practices for children and families affected by violence. This line of work considers the status of psychosocial interventions currently available in international conflict settings and seeks to identify evidence-based intervention practices that facilitate resilience in families and communities. Specific aims of this work include identifying culturally appropriate assessment and treatment practices and developing efficacious and cost-effective psychosocial interventions that can be readily disseminated in conflict settings.

Lena Verdeli

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
Teachers College Columbia University
Research topics
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Migration
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Lena Verdeli, Ph.D., MSc, is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University, and is the Founder and Director of the Teachers College Global Mental Health Lab. Over the years Dr. Verdeli has received funding from governments (US-NIMH; Canadian government –Grand Challenges Canada; UK- Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council); intergovernmental agencies (WHO, UNHCR); and foundations (NARSAD, Eleanor Cook Foundation, etc.) to test psychotherapy for prevention and treatment of mood disorders. In the past fifteen years Lena Verdeli has played a key role in landmark studies involving adaptation, training, and testing of psychotherapy protocols used by both specialists and non-specialists around the globe (psychologists, psychiatrists, primary care staff, community health workers, etc.). She collaborated internationally with academic groups, ministries of health, local NGOs and international agencies to alleviate the suffering of adults locally defined as depressed in southern Uganda; war-affected adolescents in IDP camps in northern Uganda; traumatized IDP women in Colombia; distressed patients in primary care in Goa, India; depressed community members in Haiti; war-affected Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

Dr. Verdeli is a Scientific Advisory Council member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the Scientific Advisory Board of Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. She received the Klerman Young Scientist award; the APA Division 52 Mentoring Award; and chaired the research workgroup of the Family NGO at the UN. She is the first author of the manual on Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which has been disseminated globally online by WHO (http://www.who.int/mental_health/mhgap/interpersonal_therapy/en/).

Lena Verdeli, Ph.D., MSc, is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University, and is the Founder and Director of the Teachers College Global Mental Health Lab. Over the years Dr. Verdeli has received funding from governments (US-NIMH; Canadian government –Grand Challenges Canada; UK- Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council); intergovernmental agencies (WHO, UNHCR); and foundations (NARSAD, Eleanor Cook Foundation, etc.) to test psychotherapy for prevention and treatment of mood disorders. In the past fifteen years Lena Verdeli has played a key role in landmark studies involving adaptation, training, and testing of psychotherapy protocols used by both specialists and non-specialists around the globe (psychologists, psychiatrists, primary care staff, community health workers, etc.). She collaborated internationally with academic groups, ministries of health, local NGOs and international agencies to alleviate the suffering of adults locally defined as depressed in southern Uganda; war-affected adolescents in IDP camps in northern Uganda; traumatized IDP women in Colombia; distressed patients in primary care in Goa, India; depressed community members in Haiti; war-affected Syrian refugees in Lebanon and Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.

Dr. Verdeli is a Scientific Advisory Council member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and the Scientific Advisory Board of Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. She received the Klerman Young Scientist award; the APA Division 52 Mentoring Award; and chaired the research workgroup of the Family NGO at the UN. She is the first author of the manual on Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which has been disseminated globally online by WHO (http://www.who.int/mental_health/mhgap/interpersonal_therapy/en/).

Madeleine Wayack Pambè

Faculty Affiliate
Demographer and Senior Lecturer
University Joseph KI-ZERBO
Research topics
Education
Gender
Sexual & Reproductive Health
Connect

Madeleine Wayack Pambè is a Demographer and a Senior Lecturer at University Joseph KI-ZERBO in Ouagadougou where she has been a faculty member since 2003. She completed a Research Master and a Doctoral thesis at Université Paris-Nanterre (France) and a Master of Science (MSc) in demography at Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne (France). She also holds a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Gender from the Graduate Institute of Geneva. The cross-cutting question of her research interest is how both Gender and Education frame the significant changes that are currently taking place in African societies. She has specific expertise on issues related to women empowerment and child protection and wellbeing. She worked as a researcher on the project “ National study on violence against the children in Burkina Faso” commissioned by UNICEF in 2018. She currently coordinates a project carries out in 3 countries on “The gendered socialization of very young adolescents in schools and sexual and reproductive health” funded by the IDRC and another project funded by the European Union on “ Gender-based violence and women’s socioeconomic empowerment in Ouagadougou”. She also co-coordinates a project funded by IDRC which deals with Responses to sexual violence against adolescents in Burkina Faso and respect for their sexual and reproductive rights.

Madeleine Wayack Pambè is a Demographer and a Senior Lecturer at University Joseph KI-ZERBO in Ouagadougou where she has been a faculty member since 2003. She completed a Research Master and a Doctoral thesis at Université Paris-Nanterre (France) and a Master of Science (MSc) in demography at Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne (France). She also holds a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Gender from the Graduate Institute of Geneva. The cross-cutting question of her research interest is how both Gender and Education frame the significant changes that are currently taking place in African societies. She has specific expertise on issues related to women empowerment and child protection and wellbeing. She worked as a researcher on the project “ National study on violence against the children in Burkina Faso” commissioned by UNICEF in 2018. She currently coordinates a project carries out in 3 countries on “The gendered socialization of very young adolescents in schools and sexual and reproductive health” funded by the IDRC and another project funded by the European Union on “ Gender-based violence and women’s socioeconomic empowerment in Ouagadougou”. She also co-coordinates a project funded by IDRC which deals with Responses to sexual violence against adolescents in Burkina Faso and respect for their sexual and reproductive rights.

Makini Chisolm-Straker

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine
Yale University
Research topics
Migration
Violence
Accountability & Shifting Power
Connect

Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD MPH is the 2023-24 Argiro Fellow in the Study of Modern Slavery at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of History at Yale University. Just prior to this position, she was a White House Fellow appointed to the Office of the Commissioner at the Social Security Administration. There, her portfolio included disability justice, economic mobility, housing (in)security, and racial and gender equity work. She has served in Africa, Southwest Asia, the Caribbean, Central America, and the U.S. as an emergency medicine physician and has engaged in invisible populations public health research. A leader in U.S. trafficking response efforts, Dr. Chisolm-Straker has co-edited two seminal textbooks on U.S.-based labor and sex trafficking and helped develop the country’s public health framing of anti-trafficking action. Dr. Chisolm-Straker is exploring how structural reparations can eliminate system-based precarity and her Spring 2024 course (History Department) is entitled, “Precarity as policy: A U.S. history of structural inequity.”

Makini Chisolm-Straker, MD MPH is the 2023-24 Argiro Fellow in the Study of Modern Slavery at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition and Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of History at Yale University. Just prior to this position, she was a White House Fellow appointed to the Office of the Commissioner at the Social Security Administration. There, her portfolio included disability justice, economic mobility, housing (in)security, and racial and gender equity work. She has served in Africa, Southwest Asia, the Caribbean, Central America, and the U.S. as an emergency medicine physician and has engaged in invisible populations public health research. A leader in U.S. trafficking response efforts, Dr. Chisolm-Straker has co-edited two seminal textbooks on U.S.-based labor and sex trafficking and helped develop the country’s public health framing of anti-trafficking action. Dr. Chisolm-Straker is exploring how structural reparations can eliminate system-based precarity and her Spring 2024 course (History Department) is entitled, “Precarity as policy: A U.S. history of structural inequity.”

Maria Cecilia Dedios

Faculty Affiliate
Visiting Fellow
Latin America and Caribbean Centre (LACC)
Research topics
Migration
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Connect

María Cecilia is a visiting fellow at the LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre and an assistant professor at the School of Government at Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia, where she teaches qualitative methods. She is also a research officer for the project “Pathways to reconciliation in Colombia” at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at the LSE.

Maria Cecilia is a socio-cultural psychologist. Her research focuses on adolescent development under contextual adversity with a focus on the group and cultural level dynamics that shape both positive and negative psychological outcomes in these contexts. Her PhD project, completed at the LSE, focused on violent and non-violent socialisation processes amongst the young in Colombia. The research looked comparatively at resilient youth and gang-involved youth to identify the similarities and the differences between “positive” and “negative” youth groups, the key differences in moral reasoning about violence between members of these groups, and what works for violence prevention. To do this, she employed mixed methods, including in-depth interviews, participant observation, and surveys.

María Cecilia is a consultant for the World Health Organization and the World Bank, and has conducted mixed-methods research to evaluate the development process of global guidelines and the decision making process of health stakeholders at the global level. She has worked for several years doing research on the subjective experience of mental disorders by culturally diverse populations in the United States and has also researched the processes of identity formation, resilience, and moral reasoning among Afro-descendants and internally displaced young adults in Colombia, as well as undocumented young adults in the US.

She holds a master’s degree in the social sciences from the University of Chicago and a degree in clinical psychology from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru.


María Cecilia is a visiting fellow at the LSE Latin America and Caribbean Centre and an assistant professor at the School of Government at Universidad de Los Andes in Colombia, where she teaches qualitative methods. She is also a research officer for the project “Pathways to reconciliation in Colombia” at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at the LSE.

Maria Cecilia is a socio-cultural psychologist. Her research focuses on adolescent development under contextual adversity with a focus on the group and cultural level dynamics that shape both positive and negative psychological outcomes in these contexts. Her PhD project, completed at the LSE, focused on violent and non-violent socialisation processes amongst the young in Colombia. The research looked comparatively at resilient youth and gang-involved youth to identify the similarities and the differences between “positive” and “negative” youth groups, the key differences in moral reasoning about violence between members of these groups, and what works for violence prevention. To do this, she employed mixed methods, including in-depth interviews, participant observation, and surveys.

María Cecilia is a consultant for the World Health Organization and the World Bank, and has conducted mixed-methods research to evaluate the development process of global guidelines and the decision making process of health stakeholders at the global level. She has worked for several years doing research on the subjective experience of mental disorders by culturally diverse populations in the United States and has also researched the processes of identity formation, resilience, and moral reasoning among Afro-descendants and internally displaced young adults in Colombia, as well as undocumented young adults in the US.

She holds a master’s degree in the social sciences from the University of Chicago and a degree in clinical psychology from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru.


Marius Crépin Mouguia

Faculty Affiliate
Lecturer
University of Bangui (Central African Republic)
Research topics
Violence
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Crépin Marius Mouguia is a PhD student in anthropology at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, and a lecturer-researcher (temporary) in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Bangui (Central African Republic).He is currently conducting research on childhood and youth during long-term conflict in the Central African Republic from a historical as well as an anthropological perspective. His fields of research are, among others, the environment and sustainable development, themes on which he carried out his Master's research.Recently junior researcher for Unicef ​​in a research project consisting of taking a retrospective look at the reintegration programs for children associated with armed forces and groups in the Central African Republic, he is currently continuing his field research in the north-west, in the center, in the center- east and in the capital Bangui. He has since made a career in various research projects, but also in international humanitarian NGOs in various emergency, early recovery and development projects.

Crépin Marius Mouguia is a PhD student in anthropology at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, and a lecturer-researcher (temporary) in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Bangui (Central African Republic).He is currently conducting research on childhood and youth during long-term conflict in the Central African Republic from a historical as well as an anthropological perspective. His fields of research are, among others, the environment and sustainable development, themes on which he carried out his Master's research.Recently junior researcher for Unicef ​​in a research project consisting of taking a retrospective look at the reintegration programs for children associated with armed forces and groups in the Central African Republic, he is currently continuing his field research in the north-west, in the center, in the center- east and in the capital Bangui. He has since made a career in various research projects, but also in international humanitarian NGOs in various emergency, early recovery and development projects.

Marni Sommer

Faculty Affiliate
Professor of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Education
Gender
Sexual Exploitation & Abuse
Connect

Marni Sommer, DrPH, MSN, RN, has worked in global health and development on issues ranging from improving access to essential medicines to humanitarian relief in conflict settings. Dr. Sommer's particular areas of expertise include conducting participatory research with adolescents, understanding and promoting healthy transitions to adulthood, the intersection of public health and education, gender and sexual health, and the implementation and evaluation of adolescent-focused interventions. Her doctoral research explored girls' experiences of menstruation, puberty and schooling in Tanzania, and the ways in which the onset of puberty might be disrupting girls' academic performance and healthy transition to adulthood. Dr. Sommer presently leads the Gender, Adolescent Transitions and Environment (GATE) Program, based in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences. GATE explores the intersections of gender, health, education and the environment for girls and boys transitioning into adulthood in low-income countries and in the United States. GATE also generates research and practical resources focused on improving the integration of menstrual hygiene management and gender-supportive sanitation solutions into global humanitarian response.

Marni Sommer, DrPH, MSN, RN, has worked in global health and development on issues ranging from improving access to essential medicines to humanitarian relief in conflict settings. Dr. Sommer's particular areas of expertise include conducting participatory research with adolescents, understanding and promoting healthy transitions to adulthood, the intersection of public health and education, gender and sexual health, and the implementation and evaluation of adolescent-focused interventions. Her doctoral research explored girls' experiences of menstruation, puberty and schooling in Tanzania, and the ways in which the onset of puberty might be disrupting girls' academic performance and healthy transition to adulthood. Dr. Sommer presently leads the Gender, Adolescent Transitions and Environment (GATE) Program, based in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences. GATE explores the intersections of gender, health, education and the environment for girls and boys transitioning into adulthood in low-income countries and in the United States. GATE also generates research and practical resources focused on improving the integration of menstrual hygiene management and gender-supportive sanitation solutions into global humanitarian response.

Martha Bragin

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor
Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College and the Doctoral Program in Social Welfare at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.
Research topics
Migration
Agency & Participation
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Violence
Connect

Martha Bragin, PhD, LCSW, is a Chairperson of Global Social Work and Practice with Immigrants and Refugees. She is a member of the IASC Reference Group (UN-NGO) on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings, which developed the first international consensus guidelines for the field of mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian crises, as well as technical advisor to the International Network for Education in Emergencies. Dr. Bragin has helped foster sustainable change to countries in crisis by supporting governments to develop locality based social work standards and create culturally relevant social work curricula. Recent projects have included Vietnam and Afghanistan. Dr. Bragin’s work on social work program development engages local partners to support women, children, and young people affected by violence and disaster to participate in the transformation of the communities in which they live. To insure the effectiveness of these programs she has and developed and published culturally sensitive ways to measure their effectiveness, including the Community Participatory Evaluation Tool (CPET) for use to determine baseline indicators of children’s well-being and development in cultural context. Current research includes a participatory study defining and operationalizing the concept “psychosocial wellbeing” among war affected women in Nepal Burundi and Uganda, and another on classroom based interventions to improve educational outcomes for adolescents affected by war and community violence.

Martha Bragin, PhD, LCSW, is a Chairperson of Global Social Work and Practice with Immigrants and Refugees. She is a member of the IASC Reference Group (UN-NGO) on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings, which developed the first international consensus guidelines for the field of mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian crises, as well as technical advisor to the International Network for Education in Emergencies. Dr. Bragin has helped foster sustainable change to countries in crisis by supporting governments to develop locality based social work standards and create culturally relevant social work curricula. Recent projects have included Vietnam and Afghanistan. Dr. Bragin’s work on social work program development engages local partners to support women, children, and young people affected by violence and disaster to participate in the transformation of the communities in which they live. To insure the effectiveness of these programs she has and developed and published culturally sensitive ways to measure their effectiveness, including the Community Participatory Evaluation Tool (CPET) for use to determine baseline indicators of children’s well-being and development in cultural context. Current research includes a participatory study defining and operationalizing the concept “psychosocial wellbeing” among war affected women in Nepal Burundi and Uganda, and another on classroom based interventions to improve educational outcomes for adolescents affected by war and community violence.

Mary Mendenhall

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor of Practice
Teachers College, Columbia University
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Education
Migration
Connect

Mary Mendenhall, Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Practice and the Director of the International and Comparative Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her current research interests include policies and practices of refugee education across camp, urban and resettlement contexts; teacher support and professional development in crisis settings; and the relevance and sustainability of education support provided by international organizations to displaced children and youth in conflict-affected states in Sub-Saharan Africa. Over the past three years, Dr. Mendenhall led the design, planning and implementation of Teachers for Teachers, a continuous professional development initiative for refugee and national teachers working in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. Over the next three years, she will lead a research team working on a new project in Uganda and South Sudan through and EU-funded initiative called Building Resilience in Conflict through Education. Dr. Mendenhall serves as a member of the Standards and Practice Working Group for the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) and helps lead the work of the Teachers in Crisis Contexts Collaborative, an inter-agency effort to provide continuous, quality professional development to teachers working in displacement contexts. She also serves as an advisor to the Right to Education Initiative and the Center for Learning in Practice (CLiP) at the Carey Institute for Global Good.

Mary Mendenhall, Ed.D. is an Associate Professor of Practice and the Director of the International and Comparative Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her current research interests include policies and practices of refugee education across camp, urban and resettlement contexts; teacher support and professional development in crisis settings; and the relevance and sustainability of education support provided by international organizations to displaced children and youth in conflict-affected states in Sub-Saharan Africa. Over the past three years, Dr. Mendenhall led the design, planning and implementation of Teachers for Teachers, a continuous professional development initiative for refugee and national teachers working in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. Over the next three years, she will lead a research team working on a new project in Uganda and South Sudan through and EU-funded initiative called Building Resilience in Conflict through Education. Dr. Mendenhall serves as a member of the Standards and Practice Working Group for the Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) and helps lead the work of the Teachers in Crisis Contexts Collaborative, an inter-agency effort to provide continuous, quality professional development to teachers working in displacement contexts. She also serves as an advisor to the Right to Education Initiative and the Center for Learning in Practice (CLiP) at the Carey Institute for Global Good.

Mohamadou Sall

Faculty Affiliate
Professor, Population Studies
Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar
Research topics
Migration
Gender
Sexual & Reproductive Health
Connect

Mohamadou Sall, PhD was born in 1963 in Richard Toll, Northern Senegal. His credentials include a BSc in Geography (UCAD, Senegal), a MSc in Demography (IFORD, Cameroon), a postgraduate diploma, and a PhD in Population-Development-Environment Interactions (UCL, Belgium). He is a Professor of Population Studies at the Institute for Training and Research in Population, Development and Health Reproduction (IPDSR) of the Cheikh Diop University in Dakar, Senegal and since May 2017, the Director of this Institute. He oversees the following courses: Introduction to Population Studies (An Interdisciplinary Perspective), Demographic analysis with a focus on Mortality Analysis, Population Doctrines, Methodology of Research, Population and Development, Population Policies and Programs, SPSS Software. He has been involved in many studies related to maternal and child health, community health, child protection, international migration, fertility transition, HIV/AIDS, poverty, and education as P.I. or Co-P.I. In the field of children in adversity, Professor Sall has participated with ENTSS, the Senegalese National School of Social Work and UNICEF of the studies on Child Protection in 4 regions of Senegal (Kolda, Dakar, Sedhiou and Matam). He also did a relevant research on girls’ marginality and care in Senegal with a special focus on social, demographic and economic factors that lead to marginality. Professor Sall has also been involved in research related to problems facing young refugees in the African urban context, comparing their situation in Abidjan and Dakar to their situation in Geneva, Switzerland. He has also been interested in the representations of the young Senegalese people on western countries that explain their migrations choices including their illegal and risky crossings through Atlantic and Mediterranean seas.

Mohamadou Sall, PhD was born in 1963 in Richard Toll, Northern Senegal. His credentials include a BSc in Geography (UCAD, Senegal), a MSc in Demography (IFORD, Cameroon), a postgraduate diploma, and a PhD in Population-Development-Environment Interactions (UCL, Belgium). He is a Professor of Population Studies at the Institute for Training and Research in Population, Development and Health Reproduction (IPDSR) of the Cheikh Diop University in Dakar, Senegal and since May 2017, the Director of this Institute. He oversees the following courses: Introduction to Population Studies (An Interdisciplinary Perspective), Demographic analysis with a focus on Mortality Analysis, Population Doctrines, Methodology of Research, Population and Development, Population Policies and Programs, SPSS Software. He has been involved in many studies related to maternal and child health, community health, child protection, international migration, fertility transition, HIV/AIDS, poverty, and education as P.I. or Co-P.I. In the field of children in adversity, Professor Sall has participated with ENTSS, the Senegalese National School of Social Work and UNICEF of the studies on Child Protection in 4 regions of Senegal (Kolda, Dakar, Sedhiou and Matam). He also did a relevant research on girls’ marginality and care in Senegal with a special focus on social, demographic and economic factors that lead to marginality. Professor Sall has also been involved in research related to problems facing young refugees in the African urban context, comparing their situation in Abidjan and Dakar to their situation in Geneva, Switzerland. He has also been interested in the representations of the young Senegalese people on western countries that explain their migrations choices including their illegal and risky crossings through Atlantic and Mediterranean seas.

Monette Zard

Faculty Affiliate
Allan Rosenfield Associate Professor of Forced Migration and Health and the Director of the Forced Migration and Health Program
Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Accountability & Shifting Power
Migration
Connect

Monette Zard is an expert on forced migration and human rights, and her career has spanned the fields of policy, advocacy and philanthropy. She has served as the Global Human Rights Program Officer at the Ford Foundation in New York and as Research Director at the International Council on Human Rights Policy in Geneva, Switzerland, a think tank focused on applied human rights research. Her work there explored issues of political violence and the human rights obligations of armed groups, economic and social rights and human smuggling. From 2000-2003, she was a Policy Analyst at the Migration Policy Institute in Washington D.C. and held a visiting research fellowship in law at the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford University. Prior to that, she directed the international refugee work of the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, during which time her work focused on the use of legal strategies to strengthen refugee protection in Africa as well as the particular issue of how international law should deal with refugees and asylum-seekers accused of committing serious international crimes. She has consulted on international human rights and forced migration issues for a number of organizations including Amnesty International, the Brookings Institute, Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Monette Zard is an expert on forced migration and human rights, and her career has spanned the fields of policy, advocacy and philanthropy. She has served as the Global Human Rights Program Officer at the Ford Foundation in New York and as Research Director at the International Council on Human Rights Policy in Geneva, Switzerland, a think tank focused on applied human rights research. Her work there explored issues of political violence and the human rights obligations of armed groups, economic and social rights and human smuggling. From 2000-2003, she was a Policy Analyst at the Migration Policy Institute in Washington D.C. and held a visiting research fellowship in law at the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford University. Prior to that, she directed the international refugee work of the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, during which time her work focused on the use of legal strategies to strengthen refugee protection in Africa as well as the particular issue of how international law should deal with refugees and asylum-seekers accused of committing serious international crimes. She has consulted on international human rights and forced migration issues for a number of organizations including Amnesty International, the Brookings Institute, Human Rights Watch and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Mushtaque Chowdhury

Faculty Affiliate
Vice Chairperson and advisor
BRAC
Research topics
Education
Connect

Mushtaque Chowdhury, PhD is the Vice Chair of BRAC. Previously, he was its Executive Director, Director of the Research and Evaluation Division and Dean of the James P. Grant School of Public Health. Dr. Chowdhury is also a Professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia University in New York which makes him (probably) the first Bangladeshi to hold a professorial position in an Ivy League university. He also worked as the Senior Adviser and acting Managing Director for the Rockefeller Foundation and as a MacArthur/Bell Fellow at Harvard University. Dr. Chowdhury received many awards including the prestigious ‘Medical Award of Excellence’ given by the Chicago- based Ronald McDonald House Charities (2017) and the ‘Innovator of the Year’ award from Marriott Business School at Brigham Young University in Utah (2006). He was honored by The Lancet for his contribution to global health (2013). Dr. Chowdhury is a founder of the Bangladesh Education Watch and Bangladesh Health Watch, two civil society watch-dogs. He is on the board and committees of several organizations and initiatives, including: BRAC University (member Board of Trustees) Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS) (Senior Fellow) The Humanitarian Leadership Academy in London (founding member of the Board) Compact2025 at International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC (member of working group) The Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement at UN headquarters (member of the Lead Group) Sanitation and Water for All (SWA), Unicef (member of Leaders group) Expert Group on Scaling Up in Education at the Results for Development (R4D), Washington DC (advisory member) South Asia Centre at the London School of Economics (member of Advisory Board) International Growth Centre at the London School of Economics (Senior Adviser) Bangladesh Water Multi-sector Partnership (co-Chair). The Asian Action Alliance for Human Resources in Health (AAAH) (Immediate past Chair) Citizens Platform for SDGs in Bangladesh (Centre for Policy Dialogue) (member of Core Group) The Dhaka University Statistics Department Alumni Association (DUSDAA) (President). Dr. Chowdhury has published nearly 200 articles in national and international journals. One of his books has received the 2018 University Press Ltd (UPL) award in the category of ‘Outstanding Impact’. He holds a PhD from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, an MSc from the London School of Economics and a BA (Hon’s) in Statistics from the University of Dhaka.

Mushtaque Chowdhury, PhD is the Vice Chair of BRAC. Previously, he was its Executive Director, Director of the Research and Evaluation Division and Dean of the James P. Grant School of Public Health. Dr. Chowdhury is also a Professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia University in New York which makes him (probably) the first Bangladeshi to hold a professorial position in an Ivy League university. He also worked as the Senior Adviser and acting Managing Director for the Rockefeller Foundation and as a MacArthur/Bell Fellow at Harvard University. Dr. Chowdhury received many awards including the prestigious ‘Medical Award of Excellence’ given by the Chicago- based Ronald McDonald House Charities (2017) and the ‘Innovator of the Year’ award from Marriott Business School at Brigham Young University in Utah (2006). He was honored by The Lancet for his contribution to global health (2013). Dr. Chowdhury is a founder of the Bangladesh Education Watch and Bangladesh Health Watch, two civil society watch-dogs. He is on the board and committees of several organizations and initiatives, including: BRAC University (member Board of Trustees) Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS) (Senior Fellow) The Humanitarian Leadership Academy in London (founding member of the Board) Compact2025 at International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC (member of working group) The Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement at UN headquarters (member of the Lead Group) Sanitation and Water for All (SWA), Unicef (member of Leaders group) Expert Group on Scaling Up in Education at the Results for Development (R4D), Washington DC (advisory member) South Asia Centre at the London School of Economics (member of Advisory Board) International Growth Centre at the London School of Economics (Senior Adviser) Bangladesh Water Multi-sector Partnership (co-Chair). The Asian Action Alliance for Human Resources in Health (AAAH) (Immediate past Chair) Citizens Platform for SDGs in Bangladesh (Centre for Policy Dialogue) (member of Core Group) The Dhaka University Statistics Department Alumni Association (DUSDAA) (President). Dr. Chowdhury has published nearly 200 articles in national and international journals. One of his books has received the 2018 University Press Ltd (UPL) award in the category of ‘Outstanding Impact’. He holds a PhD from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, an MSc from the London School of Economics and a BA (Hon’s) in Statistics from the University of Dhaka.

Mónica Ruiz-Casares

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Faculty Associate
Centre for Research on Children and Families, school of Social Work, and the Institute for Health and Social PolicyMcGill University
Research topics
Migration
Agency & Participation
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Dr. Ruiz-Casares is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Associate Member of the School of Social Work and the Institute for Health and Social Policy at McGill University and an investigator at the Sherpa University Institute in Montreal. Dr. Ruiz-Casares has been awarded Fellowships by the National Science Foundation, the American Association of University Women, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, Cornell University, and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec-Santé. She is also a former Richard H. Tomlinson Scholar. Her research program focuses on the wellbeing and protection of orphan, separated, and unsupervised children across cultures; children’s rights and participation; and policy and program evaluation of human services, particularly among ethno-culturally diverse communities. She leads mixed-methods studies on child wellbeing and protection cross-culturally, mainly in contexts of parent-child separation including child-headed households, children home alone, in monasteries, or in other alternative care arrangements. She is particularly interested in ethical and methodological issues involved in global mental health and protection research with and by children. Her research is inspired by action research principles. In the last decade, she has been a co-investigator on several research projects and networks funded through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec on access to health and social services by migrant, refugee, and asylum seeking families; children rights to participation and protection; and knowledge mobilization. She is a Credentialed Evaluator with the Canadian Evaluation Society and member of the Standing Committees of the International Society for Child Indicators and the McGill Global Mental Health Program.

Dr. Ruiz-Casares is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Associate Member of the School of Social Work and the Institute for Health and Social Policy at McGill University and an investigator at the Sherpa University Institute in Montreal. Dr. Ruiz-Casares has been awarded Fellowships by the National Science Foundation, the American Association of University Women, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, Cornell University, and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec-Santé. She is also a former Richard H. Tomlinson Scholar. Her research program focuses on the wellbeing and protection of orphan, separated, and unsupervised children across cultures; children’s rights and participation; and policy and program evaluation of human services, particularly among ethno-culturally diverse communities. She leads mixed-methods studies on child wellbeing and protection cross-culturally, mainly in contexts of parent-child separation including child-headed households, children home alone, in monasteries, or in other alternative care arrangements. She is particularly interested in ethical and methodological issues involved in global mental health and protection research with and by children. Her research is inspired by action research principles. In the last decade, she has been a co-investigator on several research projects and networks funded through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Fonds de Recherche du Québec on access to health and social services by migrant, refugee, and asylum seeking families; children rights to participation and protection; and knowledge mobilization. She is a Credentialed Evaluator with the Canadian Evaluation Society and member of the Standing Committees of the International Society for Child Indicators and the McGill Global Mental Health Program.

PUSKAPA, Center on Child Protection and Well-being, Universitas Indonesia

Partner Research Center
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Civil Registration
Systems Strengthening
Climate Justice
Connect

PUSKAPA is a think tank that works to overcome systemic barriers that prevent children and vulnerable populations from thriving. They focus on protecting children and ending in equity and injustice.

PUSKAPA is a think tank that works to overcome systemic barriers that prevent children and vulnerable populations from thriving. They focus on protecting children and ending in equity and injustice.

Philipp Hessel

Project Collaborator
Associate Population Affairs Officer
United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Connect

A demographer by training, he works as Associate Population Affairs Officer with the UNECE Population Unit in Geneva, Switzerland. He has conducted research on the relationship between social policies and health (inequalities) and long-term care.

A demographer by training, he works as Associate Population Affairs Officer with the UNECE Population Unit in Geneva, Switzerland. He has conducted research on the relationship between social policies and health (inequalities) and long-term care.

REACTA

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Connect

Reliance Consultancy

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Connect

Richard Wotti Wamimbi

Faculty Affiliate
Lecturer
Masters in Child Development Department at Uganda Christian University
Research topics
Child Development
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Agency & Participation
Connect

Dr. Richard Wamimbi is a Doctor of Social Sciences with over 20 years of experience in research; social development and advocacy programming to support communities address vulnerability and inequalities to overcome poverty and injustice. Richard has designed and managed numerous quantitative and qualitative child focused research and overseen household surveys with large data collection teams. He has participated in participatory qualitative data collection efforts using traditional and innovative techniques. He has served in different leadership capacities that include: Currently the founder and Executive Director of the Centres for Child Protection (CPL), East Africa Child Protection and Advocacy Leader, Global Child Protection and Advocacy Advisor, Team leader Africa Health, HIV and OVC advocacy Team; Director for the models of learning programme all for World Vision International and Executive Director for the Uganda Network of AIDS Service Organizations among others. He is also a part time lecturer to the Masters in Child Development students at Uganda Christian University and an associate at the AfriChild Centre; Makerere University Uganda and the International Institute of for Child Rights and Development Canada.

Richard earned a doctorate in social sciences from Royal Roads University Canada with a focus on strengthening community systems and practices in preventing and responding to violence against children. He holds a Master of Arts in sociology and a Bachelor of Arts in social sciences both from Makerere University Uganda His expertise and experience are embedded in (a) conducting child focused research and developing culturally grounded programmes that are protective of children; (b) developing models and strategies aimed at creating safer communities free from violence; (c) building children's agency and participation in development programmes; (d) child rights monitoring and evaluation; (f) social policy development and systems changes (g) capacity building and organizational development for child focused organisations.

Through his research and practice, Richard has with much gratitude served a wide range of small, medium and large scale public and private sector clients that include Government of Uganda, National and International development agencies, community based organizations, civil society organizations, academia, Health and Advocacy focused agencies. He has published his research and evaluation work in peer-reviewed journals.

Dr. Richard Wamimbi is a Doctor of Social Sciences with over 20 years of experience in research; social development and advocacy programming to support communities address vulnerability and inequalities to overcome poverty and injustice. Richard has designed and managed numerous quantitative and qualitative child focused research and overseen household surveys with large data collection teams. He has participated in participatory qualitative data collection efforts using traditional and innovative techniques. He has served in different leadership capacities that include: Currently the founder and Executive Director of the Centres for Child Protection (CPL), East Africa Child Protection and Advocacy Leader, Global Child Protection and Advocacy Advisor, Team leader Africa Health, HIV and OVC advocacy Team; Director for the models of learning programme all for World Vision International and Executive Director for the Uganda Network of AIDS Service Organizations among others. He is also a part time lecturer to the Masters in Child Development students at Uganda Christian University and an associate at the AfriChild Centre; Makerere University Uganda and the International Institute of for Child Rights and Development Canada.

Richard earned a doctorate in social sciences from Royal Roads University Canada with a focus on strengthening community systems and practices in preventing and responding to violence against children. He holds a Master of Arts in sociology and a Bachelor of Arts in social sciences both from Makerere University Uganda His expertise and experience are embedded in (a) conducting child focused research and developing culturally grounded programmes that are protective of children; (b) developing models and strategies aimed at creating safer communities free from violence; (c) building children's agency and participation in development programmes; (d) child rights monitoring and evaluation; (f) social policy development and systems changes (g) capacity building and organizational development for child focused organisations.

Through his research and practice, Richard has with much gratitude served a wide range of small, medium and large scale public and private sector clients that include Government of Uganda, National and International development agencies, community based organizations, civil society organizations, academia, Health and Advocacy focused agencies. He has published his research and evaluation work in peer-reviewed journals.

Sabrina Hermosilla

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health
Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Migration
Agency & Participation
Connect

Sabrina is an Assistant Professor in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Affiliated Faculty with the CPC Learning Network (’07 CPC Learning Network practica placement alumna). In addition to her position at Columbia, she serves on the Board of Directors for Roots of Health and facilitates the Research and Evaluation Thematic Group for the Olympic Refuge Foundation Think Tank. Sabrina’s work seeks to improve the health of populations affected by conflict and displacement through rigorous scholarship, innovative and applied pedagogy, and effective mentorship and service. She is dedicated to engaging in projects and initiatives that center children’s voices and agency, seek to address both proximal and distal/structural sources of violence and harm, with a focus on active prevention and destruction of harmful structures and purposeful co-creation of spaces that support healthy development, psychosocial wellbeing, and eventually happy, thriving, just societies.   Sabrina is a dedicated educator, researcher, and collaborator born in Poughkeepsie, NY and raised across New York, West Germany, and Chile. Sabrina has a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations from Colgate University, holds an MIA and MPH from Columbia University, an MS from The City College of New York, and completed her PhD in epidemiology from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. She speaks English and Spanish fluently and has previously worked in French, Mandarin, Nepali, and Russian. She has nearly two decades of experience designing and implementing studies in humanitarian contexts. In her free time Sabrina is a dedicated parent (fur and human), runner, soccer enthusiast, election poll worker, and environmentalist, who centers the environmental and social justice impact of her daily activities to create a more just and harmonious living environment for all.

Sabrina is an Assistant Professor in the Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Affiliated Faculty with the CPC Learning Network (’07 CPC Learning Network practica placement alumna). In addition to her position at Columbia, she serves on the Board of Directors for Roots of Health and facilitates the Research and Evaluation Thematic Group for the Olympic Refuge Foundation Think Tank. Sabrina’s work seeks to improve the health of populations affected by conflict and displacement through rigorous scholarship, innovative and applied pedagogy, and effective mentorship and service. She is dedicated to engaging in projects and initiatives that center children’s voices and agency, seek to address both proximal and distal/structural sources of violence and harm, with a focus on active prevention and destruction of harmful structures and purposeful co-creation of spaces that support healthy development, psychosocial wellbeing, and eventually happy, thriving, just societies.   Sabrina is a dedicated educator, researcher, and collaborator born in Poughkeepsie, NY and raised across New York, West Germany, and Chile. Sabrina has a Bachelor’s Degree in International Relations from Colgate University, holds an MIA and MPH from Columbia University, an MS from The City College of New York, and completed her PhD in epidemiology from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. She speaks English and Spanish fluently and has previously worked in French, Mandarin, Nepali, and Russian. She has nearly two decades of experience designing and implementing studies in humanitarian contexts. In her free time Sabrina is a dedicated parent (fur and human), runner, soccer enthusiast, election poll worker, and environmentalist, who centers the environmental and social justice impact of her daily activities to create a more just and harmonious living environment for all.

Sandra Garcia

Faculty Affiliate
Associate Professor in the School of Government
University of Los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Livelihoods & Economic Strengthening
Education
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Dr. Sandra Garcia is an Associate Professor in the School of Government at the University of Los Andes in Colombia. She teaches Policy Evaluation, Quantitative Methods, and Poverty, Inequality and Public Policy. She conducts research on social policy, particularly child and family policy, health and education disparities, and children poverty. Sandra has extensive experience on the impact evaluation of social programs in educational and health outcomes. Sandra recently served as the Principal Investigator for UNICEF-funded research project that developed participatory measures of poverty and wellbeing in children and adolescents. She was also the Principal Investigator for Fundacion Corona-funded research project that developed a mixed-methods methodology to examine the determinants or early school dropout in Colombia. She received her MPA in 1999 and her PhD in Social Work in 2007 from Columbia University.

Dr. Sandra Garcia is an Associate Professor in the School of Government at the University of Los Andes in Colombia. She teaches Policy Evaluation, Quantitative Methods, and Poverty, Inequality and Public Policy. She conducts research on social policy, particularly child and family policy, health and education disparities, and children poverty. Sandra has extensive experience on the impact evaluation of social programs in educational and health outcomes. Sandra recently served as the Principal Investigator for UNICEF-funded research project that developed participatory measures of poverty and wellbeing in children and adolescents. She was also the Principal Investigator for Fundacion Corona-funded research project that developed a mixed-methods methodology to examine the determinants or early school dropout in Colombia. She received her MPA in 1999 and her PhD in Social Work in 2007 from Columbia University.

Sandra Martínez

Project Collaborator
Postdoctoral Assistant
Faculty of Medicine at Universidad de los Andes Colombia
Research topics
Migration
Agency & Participation
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Martinez has a Doctorate in Demography at Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Magister in Demography, and an especialization in general demography. Coordination projects experience of public health, epidemiology, and demography investigation. Ethical performance, conciliatory, liable, High sense of belonging and leadership. Capacity to participate in interdisciplinary work teams and cross-sectional.

Martinez has a Doctorate in Demography at Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Magister in Demography, and an especialization in general demography. Coordination projects experience of public health, epidemiology, and demography investigation. Ethical performance, conciliatory, liable, High sense of belonging and leadership. Capacity to participate in interdisciplinary work teams and cross-sectional.

Sara Casey

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor of Population and Family Health
Columbia University Medical Center
Research topics
Sexual & Reproductive Health
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Sara Casey focuses on using sound data collection and analysis to improve the availability and quality of sexual and reproductive health services in countries whose health systems have been weakened by war or natural disaster. Dr. Casey is Director of the Reproductive Health Access, Information and Services in Emergencies (RAISE) Initiative, a global program collaborating with program partners to identify and respond to challenges to improve contraceptive and abortion-related services in humanitarian settings in Africa and Asia. She provides technical guidance to partners to establish program monitoring and evaluation systems and conduct health facility assessments, population-based surveys and other implementation research.

Sara Casey focuses on using sound data collection and analysis to improve the availability and quality of sexual and reproductive health services in countries whose health systems have been weakened by war or natural disaster. Dr. Casey is Director of the Reproductive Health Access, Information and Services in Emergencies (RAISE) Initiative, a global program collaborating with program partners to identify and respond to challenges to improve contraceptive and abortion-related services in humanitarian settings in Africa and Asia. She provides technical guidance to partners to establish program monitoring and evaluation systems and conduct health facility assessments, population-based surveys and other implementation research.

Sarah Meyer

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant professor in clinical population and family health
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Research topics
Migration
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
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Sarah Meyer, PhD, MPhil, is an assistant professor in clinical population and family health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. She has extensive experience managing and leading research projects focused on migration, child protection and mental health in humanitarian and low-income settings. Her PhD research focused on migration and mental health on the Thailand-Burma border, and she has led qualitative and quantitative training and data collection in Cambodia, Rwanda, Uganda and Thailand. She is currently the co-investigator on a joint study between the CPC Learning Network and UNHCR, on measuring child protection in refugee settings. She has led evaluations of mental health and psychosocial support for UNHCR and the Interagency Standing Committee Reference Group on mental health and psychosocial support. She has presented her research in academic and policy settings in Geneva, Kolkata, Lisbon, Salzburg, Oxford and Melbourne. Sarah received a PhD in International Health from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, a certificate in Applied Mental Health Research from Johns Hopkins, an MPhil in Development Studies from the University of Oxford and a BA from Monash University.

Sarah Meyer, PhD, MPhil, is an assistant professor in clinical population and family health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. She has extensive experience managing and leading research projects focused on migration, child protection and mental health in humanitarian and low-income settings. Her PhD research focused on migration and mental health on the Thailand-Burma border, and she has led qualitative and quantitative training and data collection in Cambodia, Rwanda, Uganda and Thailand. She is currently the co-investigator on a joint study between the CPC Learning Network and UNHCR, on measuring child protection in refugee settings. She has led evaluations of mental health and psychosocial support for UNHCR and the Interagency Standing Committee Reference Group on mental health and psychosocial support. She has presented her research in academic and policy settings in Geneva, Kolkata, Lisbon, Salzburg, Oxford and Melbourne. Sarah received a PhD in International Health from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, a certificate in Applied Mental Health Research from Johns Hopkins, an MPhil in Development Studies from the University of Oxford and a BA from Monash University.

Saydah Williamson Taylor

Faculty Affiliate
Instructor
University of Liberia West Africa
Research topics
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Child Development
Systems Strengthening
Connect

A passionate, well skilled, and motivated Sociologist/Behavioral, mental Health Specialist & Social Worker, with over 25 years of clinical experience in mental and behavioral health. With a track record of safe protecting and promoting the welfare of children, adolescents and vulnerable adults. Knowledgeable in providing individual, groups, communities and family counseling. Provide psychosocial assessments to referred clients.

Multi tasked and able to manage a patient’s mental health issues based upon an appropriate assessment and identified signs and symptoms associated with mental, behavioral, or physical health to include substance abuse; and provide or make the appropriate treatment or referral. Supervised multidisciplinary teams combined with nurses, social workers, psychologists, education professionals, other professional clinicians, social & juvenile justice advocates to include psychiatrists

A passionate, well skilled, and motivated Sociologist/Behavioral, mental Health Specialist & Social Worker, with over 25 years of clinical experience in mental and behavioral health. With a track record of safe protecting and promoting the welfare of children, adolescents and vulnerable adults. Knowledgeable in providing individual, groups, communities and family counseling. Provide psychosocial assessments to referred clients.

Multi tasked and able to manage a patient’s mental health issues based upon an appropriate assessment and identified signs and symptoms associated with mental, behavioral, or physical health to include substance abuse; and provide or make the appropriate treatment or referral. Supervised multidisciplinary teams combined with nurses, social workers, psychologists, education professionals, other professional clinicians, social & juvenile justice advocates to include psychiatrists

Shanaaz Mathews

Faculty Affiliate
Director of the Children’s Institute and a professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences
University of Cape Town.
Research topics
Gender
Violence
Systems Strengthening
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Shanaaz Mathews has a PhD in Public Health from the University of the Witwatersrand. She has 30 years’ experience in the women’s and children’s sectors and has worked within civil society organisations as an academic and technical advisor to government programs specializing in violence against women and children. She currently serves as an International Advisory Board member for the UNICEF Innocenti Research Office Florence, on the Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence and is managing committee member for theDST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Human Development, at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her research interests include violence against women and children, as well as pathways to violent masculinities using both qualitative and quantitative approaches.She has led the seminal research into child homicide in South Africa. Her current research is focused on understanding gaps in the child protection system with a focus on alternative models of treating trauma in low-resourced settings. She has led the determinants of violence against women and children study for the South African Inter-ministerial parliamentary committee and has served as a technical advisor on South Africa’s diagnostic review of government programs to address violence against women and children.

Shanaaz Mathews has a PhD in Public Health from the University of the Witwatersrand. She has 30 years’ experience in the women’s and children’s sectors and has worked within civil society organisations as an academic and technical advisor to government programs specializing in violence against women and children. She currently serves as an International Advisory Board member for the UNICEF Innocenti Research Office Florence, on the Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence and is managing committee member for theDST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Human Development, at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her research interests include violence against women and children, as well as pathways to violent masculinities using both qualitative and quantitative approaches.She has led the seminal research into child homicide in South Africa. Her current research is focused on understanding gaps in the child protection system with a focus on alternative models of treating trauma in low-resourced settings. She has led the determinants of violence against women and children study for the South African Inter-ministerial parliamentary committee and has served as a technical advisor on South Africa’s diagnostic review of government programs to address violence against women and children.

Susan Walker

Faculty Affiliate
Professor of Nutrition and Director of the Caribbean Institute for Health Research
University of the West Indies, Jamaica
Research topics
Child Development
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Community & Family-Level Interventions
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Susan Walker, PhD is Professor of Nutrition and Director of the Caribbean Institute for Health Research at The University of the West Indies, Jamaica. She heads the Child Development Research Group whose work on low cost approaches to promote children’s cognitive and social-emotional development has been critical in driving global attention to the importance of responsive interactions and early learning opportunities for children under 3 years. Recent work includes evaluation of parenting programs feasible at scale in three Caribbean countries; development and evaluation of a training package “Reach Up: An Early Childhood Parenting Programme” based on the Jamaica home visit program, and the 30 year follow-up of the Jamaica supplementation and stimulation trial. She was lead author in papers in the highly influential Lancet series on child development (2007, 2011), author in the 2016 series, and a coordinator of the 2013 series on Maternal and Child Nutrition. She was a member of the National Academy of Medicine’s Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally, and is a founding member of the Global Child Development Group (GCDG) which promotes research on child development and translation of research to policy.

Susan Walker, PhD is Professor of Nutrition and Director of the Caribbean Institute for Health Research at The University of the West Indies, Jamaica. She heads the Child Development Research Group whose work on low cost approaches to promote children’s cognitive and social-emotional development has been critical in driving global attention to the importance of responsive interactions and early learning opportunities for children under 3 years. Recent work includes evaluation of parenting programs feasible at scale in three Caribbean countries; development and evaluation of a training package “Reach Up: An Early Childhood Parenting Programme” based on the Jamaica home visit program, and the 30 year follow-up of the Jamaica supplementation and stimulation trial. She was lead author in papers in the highly influential Lancet series on child development (2007, 2011), author in the 2016 series, and a coordinator of the 2013 series on Maternal and Child Nutrition. She was a member of the National Academy of Medicine’s Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally, and is a founding member of the Global Child Development Group (GCDG) which promotes research on child development and translation of research to policy.

Tatiana Andia

Faculty Affiliate
Economist & historian
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Research topics
Systems Strengthening
Agency & Participation
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Connect

Dr.Andia is an economist and historian from the Universidad de los Andes with a Masters in Development from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a PhD in Sociology from Brown University. Her thesis “Bureaucrats against the State: the making of pharmaceutical policy in Latin America” compares the experience of Brazil and Colombia from the 1990s to today and analyzes the leading role played by experts in public health and other fields, temporary visitors to the State, they played in the design of the pharmaceutical policies of both countries. In addition to my PhD in Sociology, I completed the Graduate Program in Development at the Watson Institute at the same university. She joined the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Universidad de los Andes to contribute to the creation and implementation of the option and the master's and undergraduate programs in sociology. Before that, Dr.Andia worked at the Center for Interdisciplinary Development Studies (CIDER) at the Universidad de los Andes, first as director of academic programs and later as a professor.  She has always been interested in the political economy of development, particularly as it relates to health inequalities, the tensions between global economic integration and the guarantee of social rights, and the theories of the state and social movements. She was an advisor to the Minister of Health for pharmaceutical policy, administrative editor of the journal Studies in Comparative International Development (SCID) and has carried out consulting projects for the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the World Bank and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on drug prices, health litigation and intellectual property and public health standards.  Currently, Dr.Andia coordinates the "Visible Health" project, which was created with a group of students from different faculties to investigate and make visible the fundamental elements and events of the Colombian Health System, in order to transform said knowledge into information for public consumption and plausible recommendations. of public policy.

Dr.Andia is an economist and historian from the Universidad de los Andes with a Masters in Development from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a PhD in Sociology from Brown University. Her thesis “Bureaucrats against the State: the making of pharmaceutical policy in Latin America” compares the experience of Brazil and Colombia from the 1990s to today and analyzes the leading role played by experts in public health and other fields, temporary visitors to the State, they played in the design of the pharmaceutical policies of both countries. In addition to my PhD in Sociology, I completed the Graduate Program in Development at the Watson Institute at the same university. She joined the Faculty of Social Sciences of the Universidad de los Andes to contribute to the creation and implementation of the option and the master's and undergraduate programs in sociology. Before that, Dr.Andia worked at the Center for Interdisciplinary Development Studies (CIDER) at the Universidad de los Andes, first as director of academic programs and later as a professor.  She has always been interested in the political economy of development, particularly as it relates to health inequalities, the tensions between global economic integration and the guarantee of social rights, and the theories of the state and social movements. She was an advisor to the Minister of Health for pharmaceutical policy, administrative editor of the journal Studies in Comparative International Development (SCID) and has carried out consulting projects for the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the World Bank and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on drug prices, health litigation and intellectual property and public health standards.  Currently, Dr.Andia coordinates the "Visible Health" project, which was created with a group of students from different faculties to investigate and make visible the fundamental elements and events of the Colombian Health System, in order to transform said knowledge into information for public consumption and plausible recommendations. of public policy.

Terre des hommes Burkina Faso

Project Collaborator
Research topics
Agency & Participation
Child Labor
Tools & Training
Connect

The Terre des hommes foundation is committed to protecting children’s lives and their rights, and improving their well-being. They aim to do so through innovative programmes focused on health, migration and access to justice, specially designed to have both short- and long-term impacts.  

For more than 60 years, They have been working in difficult situations, in countries at war, regions devastated by natural disasters, and places where poverty and malnutrition force millions of children and their families to migrate elsewhere. They provide direct and indirect support to millions of children, their families and communities in around thirty countries every year.

The Terre des hommes foundation is committed to protecting children’s lives and their rights, and improving their well-being. They aim to do so through innovative programmes focused on health, migration and access to justice, specially designed to have both short- and long-term impacts.  

For more than 60 years, They have been working in difficult situations, in countries at war, regions devastated by natural disasters, and places where poverty and malnutrition force millions of children and their families to migrate elsewhere. They provide direct and indirect support to millions of children, their families and communities in around thirty countries every year.

The AfriChild Centre of Excellence for the Study of the African Child, Makerere University, Uganda

Partner Research Center
Research topics
Child Development
Systems Strengthening
Tools & Training
Agency & Participation
Connect

The AfriChild Centre exists to generate research that informs policy and practice for the well-being of children. They strive for an Africa where children's well-being is realized for sustainable development.

The AfriChild Centre exists to generate research that informs policy and practice for the well-being of children. They strive for an Africa where children's well-being is realized for sustainable development.

Theresa Betancourt

Faculty Affiliate
Salem Professor in Global Practice
Boston College School of Social Work and
Research topics
Violence
Community & Family-Level Interventions
Migration
Agency & Participation
Connect

Theresa S. Betancourt, ScD, MA, is director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her central research interests include the developmental and psychosocial consequences of concentrated adversity on children, youth and families; resilience and protective processes in child and adolescent mental health and child development; refugee families; and applied cross-cultural mental health research. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone (LSWAY). This research led to the development of a group mental health intervention for war-affected youth that demonstrated effectiveness for improving emotion regulation, daily functioning and school functioning in war-affected youth. This intervention, the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI), is now at the core of a scale-up study within youth employment programs now underway in collaboration with the World Bank and Government of Sierra Leone as a part of the NIMH-funded Mental Health Services and Implementation Science Research Hub called Youth FORWARD

Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence. This intervention, called Sugira Muryango (Strengthen the Family), has a focus on father engagement and violence reduction and can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in low-resource settings. With support from The LEGO Foundation, the RPCA will be conducting implementation research on the PLAY Collaborative, a multi-level strategy to scale out the intervention to all families ranked as living in extreme poverty across three Districts in Rwanda in the years ahead. Domestically, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. She has written extensively on mental health and resilience in children facing adversity including recent articles in Child Development, The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Social Science and Medicine, JAMA Psychiatry, AJPH and PLOS One. Her work has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com and in an interview with Larry King.

Theresa S. Betancourt, ScD, MA, is director of the Research Program on Children and Adversity (RPCA). Her central research interests include the developmental and psychosocial consequences of concentrated adversity on children, youth and families; resilience and protective processes in child and adolescent mental health and child development; refugee families; and applied cross-cultural mental health research. She is Principal Investigator of an intergenerational study of war/prospective longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone (LSWAY). This research led to the development of a group mental health intervention for war-affected youth that demonstrated effectiveness for improving emotion regulation, daily functioning and school functioning in war-affected youth. This intervention, the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI), is now at the core of a scale-up study within youth employment programs now underway in collaboration with the World Bank and Government of Sierra Leone as a part of the NIMH-funded Mental Health Services and Implementation Science Research Hub called Youth FORWARD

Betancourt has also developed and evaluated the impact of a Family Strengthening Intervention for HIV-affected children and families and is leading the investigation of a home-visiting early childhood development (ECD) intervention to promote enriched parent-child relationships and prevent violence. This intervention, called Sugira Muryango (Strengthen the Family), has a focus on father engagement and violence reduction and can be integrated within poverty reduction/social protection initiatives in low-resource settings. With support from The LEGO Foundation, the RPCA will be conducting implementation research on the PLAY Collaborative, a multi-level strategy to scale out the intervention to all families ranked as living in extreme poverty across three Districts in Rwanda in the years ahead. Domestically, she is engaged in community-based participatory research on family-based prevention of emotional and behavioral problems in refugee children and adolescents resettled in the U.S. She has written extensively on mental health and resilience in children facing adversity including recent articles in Child Development, The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Social Science and Medicine, JAMA Psychiatry, AJPH and PLOS One. Her work has been profiled in the New Yorker, National Geographic, NPR, CNN.com and in an interview with Larry King.

Wietse Tol

Faculty Affiliate
Assistant Professor in Global Mental Health at the Department of Mental Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Research topics
Violence
Mental Health & Psychosocial Support
Connect

Wietse A. Tol, PhD, is the Dr. Ali and Rose Kawi Assistant Professor in Global Mental Health at the Department of Mental Health of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Program Director of the Peter C. Alderman Foundation. His main interest concerns the interplay between science and practice, particularly around (preventive) mental health interventions for populations affected by adversity in low- and middle-income countries. He has conducted qualitative and quantitative research with violence-affected child and adult populations in Nepal, Burundi, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Timor-Leste. He regularly consults with United Nations and (international) non-governmental organizations with regard to needs assessment, capacity building, and monitoring and evaluation. His research has been published in the Lancet, JAMA, PLoS Medicine, Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, World Psychiatry, and Social Science & Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Tol was awarded the Chaim and Bela Danieli Young Professional Award by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

Wietse A. Tol, PhD, is the Dr. Ali and Rose Kawi Assistant Professor in Global Mental Health at the Department of Mental Health of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Program Director of the Peter C. Alderman Foundation. His main interest concerns the interplay between science and practice, particularly around (preventive) mental health interventions for populations affected by adversity in low- and middle-income countries. He has conducted qualitative and quantitative research with violence-affected child and adult populations in Nepal, Burundi, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Timor-Leste. He regularly consults with United Nations and (international) non-governmental organizations with regard to needs assessment, capacity building, and monitoring and evaluation. His research has been published in the Lancet, JAMA, PLoS Medicine, Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, World Psychiatry, and Social Science & Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Tol was awarded the Chaim and Bela Danieli Young Professional Award by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

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